Mushrooms, Tumors, and Immunity: An Update

Andrea T. Borchers, Carl L Keen, M. Eric Gershwini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

298 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is significant interest in the use of mushrooms and/or mushroom extracts as dietary supplements based on theories that they enhance immune function and promote health. To some extent, select mushrooms have been shown to have stimulatory action on immune responsiveness, particularly when studied in vitro. However, despite their widespread use for potential health benefits, there is a surprising paucity of epidemiologic and experimental studies that address the biologic activities of mushrooms after oral administration to animals or humans. There have been a number of studies that have addressed the ability of mushrooms to modulate mononuclear cell activation and the phenotypic expression of cytokines and their cognate receptors. There have also been a number of attempts to determine antitumor activities of mushrooms. Such studies are important because many of the components of mushrooms do potentially have significant biologic activity. All data, however, should be tempered by the possibility that there are toxic levels of metals, including arsenic, lead, cadmium, and mercury as well as the presence of radioactive contamination with 137Cs. In this review, we will present the comparative biology with respect to both immunological and antitumor activities of mushroom extracts and also highlight the need for further evidence-based research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)393-406
Number of pages14
JournalExperimental Biology and Medicine
Volume229
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 2004

Fingerprint

Agaricales
Tumors
Immunity
Dietary supplements
Health
Poisons
Arsenic
Mercury
Cadmium
Neoplasms
Animals
Contamination
Metals
Chemical activation
Cytokines
Insurance Benefits
Dietary Supplements
Oral Administration
Epidemiologic Studies
Lead

Keywords

  • Carcinogenesis
  • Dietary supplements
  • Heavy metal contamination
  • Immune modulation
  • Mushrooms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Borchers, A. T., Keen, C. L., & Gershwini, M. E. (2004). Mushrooms, Tumors, and Immunity: An Update. Experimental Biology and Medicine, 229(5), 393-406.

Mushrooms, Tumors, and Immunity : An Update. / Borchers, Andrea T.; Keen, Carl L; Gershwini, M. Eric.

In: Experimental Biology and Medicine, Vol. 229, No. 5, 05.2004, p. 393-406.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Borchers, AT, Keen, CL & Gershwini, ME 2004, 'Mushrooms, Tumors, and Immunity: An Update', Experimental Biology and Medicine, vol. 229, no. 5, pp. 393-406.
Borchers AT, Keen CL, Gershwini ME. Mushrooms, Tumors, and Immunity: An Update. Experimental Biology and Medicine. 2004 May;229(5):393-406.
Borchers, Andrea T. ; Keen, Carl L ; Gershwini, M. Eric. / Mushrooms, Tumors, and Immunity : An Update. In: Experimental Biology and Medicine. 2004 ; Vol. 229, No. 5. pp. 393-406.
@article{ed0e204db30a415aaedf0b4371b6f320,
title = "Mushrooms, Tumors, and Immunity: An Update",
abstract = "There is significant interest in the use of mushrooms and/or mushroom extracts as dietary supplements based on theories that they enhance immune function and promote health. To some extent, select mushrooms have been shown to have stimulatory action on immune responsiveness, particularly when studied in vitro. However, despite their widespread use for potential health benefits, there is a surprising paucity of epidemiologic and experimental studies that address the biologic activities of mushrooms after oral administration to animals or humans. There have been a number of studies that have addressed the ability of mushrooms to modulate mononuclear cell activation and the phenotypic expression of cytokines and their cognate receptors. There have also been a number of attempts to determine antitumor activities of mushrooms. Such studies are important because many of the components of mushrooms do potentially have significant biologic activity. All data, however, should be tempered by the possibility that there are toxic levels of metals, including arsenic, lead, cadmium, and mercury as well as the presence of radioactive contamination with 137Cs. In this review, we will present the comparative biology with respect to both immunological and antitumor activities of mushroom extracts and also highlight the need for further evidence-based research.",
keywords = "Carcinogenesis, Dietary supplements, Heavy metal contamination, Immune modulation, Mushrooms",
author = "Borchers, {Andrea T.} and Keen, {Carl L} and Gershwini, {M. Eric}",
year = "2004",
month = "5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "229",
pages = "393--406",
journal = "Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine (New York, N. Y.)",
issn = "1535-3702",
publisher = "Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mushrooms, Tumors, and Immunity

T2 - An Update

AU - Borchers, Andrea T.

AU - Keen, Carl L

AU - Gershwini, M. Eric

PY - 2004/5

Y1 - 2004/5

N2 - There is significant interest in the use of mushrooms and/or mushroom extracts as dietary supplements based on theories that they enhance immune function and promote health. To some extent, select mushrooms have been shown to have stimulatory action on immune responsiveness, particularly when studied in vitro. However, despite their widespread use for potential health benefits, there is a surprising paucity of epidemiologic and experimental studies that address the biologic activities of mushrooms after oral administration to animals or humans. There have been a number of studies that have addressed the ability of mushrooms to modulate mononuclear cell activation and the phenotypic expression of cytokines and their cognate receptors. There have also been a number of attempts to determine antitumor activities of mushrooms. Such studies are important because many of the components of mushrooms do potentially have significant biologic activity. All data, however, should be tempered by the possibility that there are toxic levels of metals, including arsenic, lead, cadmium, and mercury as well as the presence of radioactive contamination with 137Cs. In this review, we will present the comparative biology with respect to both immunological and antitumor activities of mushroom extracts and also highlight the need for further evidence-based research.

AB - There is significant interest in the use of mushrooms and/or mushroom extracts as dietary supplements based on theories that they enhance immune function and promote health. To some extent, select mushrooms have been shown to have stimulatory action on immune responsiveness, particularly when studied in vitro. However, despite their widespread use for potential health benefits, there is a surprising paucity of epidemiologic and experimental studies that address the biologic activities of mushrooms after oral administration to animals or humans. There have been a number of studies that have addressed the ability of mushrooms to modulate mononuclear cell activation and the phenotypic expression of cytokines and their cognate receptors. There have also been a number of attempts to determine antitumor activities of mushrooms. Such studies are important because many of the components of mushrooms do potentially have significant biologic activity. All data, however, should be tempered by the possibility that there are toxic levels of metals, including arsenic, lead, cadmium, and mercury as well as the presence of radioactive contamination with 137Cs. In this review, we will present the comparative biology with respect to both immunological and antitumor activities of mushroom extracts and also highlight the need for further evidence-based research.

KW - Carcinogenesis

KW - Dietary supplements

KW - Heavy metal contamination

KW - Immune modulation

KW - Mushrooms

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=2142642293&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=2142642293&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 15096651

AN - SCOPUS:2142642293

VL - 229

SP - 393

EP - 406

JO - Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine (New York, N. Y.)

JF - Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine (New York, N. Y.)

SN - 1535-3702

IS - 5

ER -