Mushroom Poisoning Cases in Dogs and Cats: Diagnosis and Treatment of Hepatotoxic, Neurotoxic, Gastroenterotoxic, Nephrotoxic, and Muscarinic Mushrooms

Birgit Puschner, Colette Wegenast

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ingestion of poisonous mushrooms by small animals can lead to liver failure, neurotoxicity, or gastrointestinal irritation. Although amanita poisoning can be lethal, ingestion of other toxic mushrooms is generally self-limiting and not life threatening. Most cases are undiagnosed, as routine diagnostic tests only exist for amanitins and psilocin. Early detection of amanitin exposure can greatly aid in the therapeutic intervention by allowing veterinarians to make timely decisions regarding patient management. Treatment is generally supportive, but specific therapeutic measures exist for amanitin and psilocin exposures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalVeterinary Clinics of North America - Small Animal Practice
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Keywords

  • Amanita
  • Amanitins
  • Gastrointestinal irritation
  • Hepatotoxic mushrooms
  • Liver failure
  • Neurotoxicosis
  • Psilocin
  • Toxicosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Small Animals

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