Muscle injury following experimental intraoperative irradiation

B. E. Powers, E. L. Gillette, S. L McChesney Gillette, Richard A Lecouteur, S. J. Withrow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

The paraaortic region of beagle dogs was irradiated to 15 to 55 Gy intraoperative irradiation, 10 to 47.5 Gy intraoperative irradiation following 50 Gy external beam irradiation in 25 fractions, or 50 to 80 Gy external beam irradiation in 30 fractions. Six MeV electrons were used for intraoperative irradiation, and external beam irradiation was done using photons from a 6 MV linear accelerator. The psoas muscle in the irradiation field was examined histomorphometrically 2 or 5 years after irradiation. The percentage of muscle fibers and capillaries decreased, whereas the percentage of connective tissue increased with increased dose for both intraoperative irradiation only and intraoperative irradiation plus external beam irradiation. The dose causing a 50% decrease in the percentage of muscle fibers was 21.2 Gy and 33.8 Gy at 2 and 5 years, respectively, after intraoperative irradiation alone, and 22.9 Gy and 25.2 Gy at 2 and 5 years, respectively, after intraoperative irradiation combined with 50 Gy external beam irradiation. The ED50 for severe vessel lesions was 19.2 Gy and 25.8 Gy at 2 and 5 years, respectively, after intraoperative irradiation alone and 16.0 Gy and 18.0 Gy at 2 and 5 years, respectively, after intraoperative irradiation combined with 50 Gy external beam irradiation. External beam irradiation alone caused a slight decrease in percentage of muscle fibers with increased dose, and vessel lesions were infrequent or mild. Radiation-induced muscle injury was characterized by loss of muscle fibers, decreased fiber size, severe vessel lesions, hemorrhage, inflammation, coagulation necrosis, and fibrosis. These histopathologic characteristics distinguish this muscle injury from that caused by neurogenic atrophy. These data indicate that radiation-induced muscle injury most likely was caused by injury of the supporting vasculature. The lesions produced were largely a function of the single intraoperative dose rather than the external beam fractionated doses. Furthermore, it appears that 20 to 25 Gy intraoperative irradiation combined with 50 Gy external beam irradiation may be near the maximum tolerated dose by sublumbar musculature and its supporting vasculature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)463-471
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Canine
  • Intraoperative irradiation
  • Late effects
  • Muscle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiation

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