MTOR and the health benefits of exercise

Kurt Watson, Keith Baar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

Exercise is the greatest physiological stress that our bodies experience. For example, during maximal endurance exercise in elite athlete's cardiac output can increase up to 8-fold and the working muscles receive 21-times more blood each minute than at rest. Given the physiological stress associated with exercise and the adaptations that occur to handle this stress, it is not surprising that exercise training is known to prevent or effectively treat a multitude of degenerative conditions including cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, depression, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and many others. Many of the health benefits of exercise are mediated by the mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), either in complex 1 or 2, not only within the working muscle, but also in distant tissues such as fat, liver, and brain. This review will discuss how exercise activates mTOR in diverse tissues and the ways that mTOR is important in the adaptive response that makes us bigger, stronger, and healthier as a result of exercise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)130-139
Number of pages10
JournalSeminars in Cell and Developmental Biology
Volume36
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Keywords

  • Amino acids
  • Cancer
  • Inactivity
  • Longevity
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'MTOR and the health benefits of exercise'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this