Mouse host unlicensed NK cells promote donor allogeneic bone marrow engraftment

Maite Alvarez, Kai Sun, William J Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Natural killer (NK) cells exist as subsets based on expression of inhibitory receptors that recognize major histocompatibility complex I (MHCI) molecules. NK cell subsets bearing MHCI binding receptors for self-MHCI have been termedas "licensed" and exhibitahigher ability to respond to stimuli. In the context of bone marrow transplantation (BMT), host licensed-NK (L-NK) cells have also been demonstrated to be responsible for the acute rejection of allogeneic and MHCI-deficient BM cells (BMCs)in mice after lethal irradiation. However, the role of recipient unlicensed-NK (U-NK) cells has not been well established with regard to allogeneic BMC resistance. After NK cell stimulation, the prior depletion of host L-NK cells resulted in a marked increase of donor engraftment compared with the untreated group. Surprisingly, this increased donor engraftment was reduced after total host NK cell depletion, indicating that U-NK cells can actually promote donor allogeneic BMC engraftment. Furthermore, direct coculture of U-NK cells with allogeneic but not syngeneic BMCs resulted in increased colonyforming unit cell growth in vitro, which was at least partially mediated by granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production. These data demonstrate that host NK cell subsets exert markedly different roles in allogeneic BMC engraftment where host L- and U-NK cells reject or promote donor allogeneic BMC engraftment, respectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1202-1205
Number of pages4
JournalBlood
Volume127
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 3 2016

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Bearings (structural)
Cell growth
Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Natural Killer Cells
Bone
Bone Marrow
Irradiation
Molecules
Major Histocompatibility Complex
Coculture Techniques
Bone Marrow Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Immunology
  • Medicine(all)
  • Hematology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Mouse host unlicensed NK cells promote donor allogeneic bone marrow engraftment. / Alvarez, Maite; Sun, Kai; Murphy, William J.

In: Blood, Vol. 127, No. 9, 03.03.2016, p. 1202-1205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alvarez, Maite ; Sun, Kai ; Murphy, William J. / Mouse host unlicensed NK cells promote donor allogeneic bone marrow engraftment. In: Blood. 2016 ; Vol. 127, No. 9. pp. 1202-1205.
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