Morphologic effects of long-term exposure to ozone on respiratory tracts of monkeys and rats. Implications for human health

Donald Dungworth, Dallas Hyde, Charles Plopper, Walter Tyler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to summarize current knowledge regarding the morphologic effects of ozone on respiratory tracts of monkeys and rats. Special reference is made to implications for possible long-term consequences of exposure of human populations to ozone in photochemical smog. The emphasis is on findings in monkeys because they can be more confidently extrapolated to humans. A persistent respiratory bronchiolitis is produced in monkey by daily 8-hour exposures to 0.15ppm ozone. This provides reasonably strong evidence that human populations exposed to concentrations reaching daily peaks of 0.2ppm or more are also likely to develop persistent bronchiolitis. The bronchiolitis at ambient concentrations in monkeys provides a plausible basis for reported effects in sensitive subpopulations of humans eg. children. Minor alterations in lung growth occur in young monkeys exposed to 0.25ppm of ozone for 18 months. This stresses the importance of further studies of the effects of ambient levels of ozone on lung growth and development relative to the vulnerability of children to effects of pollutants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - A&WMA Annual Meeting
Editors Anon
Place of PublicationPittsburgh, PA, United States
PublisherPubl by Air & Waste Management Assoc
Volume1
StatePublished - 1989
EventProceedings - 82nd A&WMA Annual Meeting - Anaheim, CA, USA
Duration: Jun 25 1989Jun 30 1989

Other

OtherProceedings - 82nd A&WMA Annual Meeting
CityAnaheim, CA, USA
Period6/25/896/30/89

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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    Dungworth, D., Hyde, D., Plopper, C., & Tyler, W. (1989). Morphologic effects of long-term exposure to ozone on respiratory tracts of monkeys and rats. Implications for human health. In Anon (Ed.), Proceedings - A&WMA Annual Meeting (Vol. 1). Publ by Air & Waste Management Assoc.