Morbidity and mortality in free-living raptorial birds of Northern California: A retrospective study, 1983-1994

Teresa Y. Morishita, Asta T. Fullerton, Linda J Lowenstine, Ian Gardner, Dale L. Brooks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A 12-year (1983-1994) retrospective study was conducted to determine the causes of morbidity and mortality in free-living raptorial birds of northern California. Of the 409 birds included in this study, 58% died of traumatic injuries and 30% died of infectious disease. The most frequent presenting signs were fractures, recumbency, shock, suboptimal weight, and dehydration. Although 30% of these raptors were in good nutritional condition, nearly 50% either were in fair condition or were emaciated. Pathologic lesions found in a few raptors (0.8%) indicated an underlying disease (eg, tuberculosis) was present before the birds succumbed to an acute, lethal, traumatic incident.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)78-81
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Avian Medicine and Surgery
Volume12
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1998

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retrospective studies
Raptors
Birds
morbidity
Retrospective Studies
birds of prey
Morbidity
Mortality
birds
Dehydration
tuberculosis
lesions (animal)
infectious diseases
Communicable Diseases
Shock
Tuberculosis
Weights and Measures
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Hawks
  • Morbidity
  • Mortality
  • Nutritional status
  • Owls
  • Pathology
  • Raptors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Morbidity and mortality in free-living raptorial birds of Northern California : A retrospective study, 1983-1994. / Morishita, Teresa Y.; Fullerton, Asta T.; Lowenstine, Linda J; Gardner, Ian; Brooks, Dale L.

In: Journal of Avian Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 12, No. 2, 1998, p. 78-81.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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