Monoclonal antibody to the receptor for murine coronavirus MHV-A59 inhibits viral replication in vivo

Abigail L. Smith, Christine B. Cardellichio, Deborah F. Winograd, Mark S. De Souza, Stephen W Barthold, Kathryn V. Holmes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Because many strains of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) infect laboratory mice, no effective vaccine has yet been developed. An alternative approach to control MHV disease is the use of a host cell receptor-targeted ligand. To address the potential usefulness of this approach, a monoclonal antibody directed against the host cell receptor for the coronavirus MHV-A59 was administered to infant mice that were then challenged oronasally with 104 intracerebral infant mouse median lethal doses of MHV-A59. Antibody treatment of virus-challenged mice resulted in lower proportions of mice with MHV-A59 in target organs and markedly reduced viral titers in these organs compared with mock-treated infected mice. Some antibody-treated infected mice survived for 7 days after viral challenge, whereas no mock-treated, infected mice survived beyond day 3 after viral inoculation. These results support a receptor-targeted approach to intervention in coronavirus disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)879-882
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume163
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Murine hepatitis virus
Monoclonal Antibodies
Coronavirus
coronavirus receptor
Antibodies
Virus Diseases
Vaccines
Ligands
Viruses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Smith, A. L., Cardellichio, C. B., Winograd, D. F., De Souza, M. S., Barthold, S. W., & Holmes, K. V. (1991). Monoclonal antibody to the receptor for murine coronavirus MHV-A59 inhibits viral replication in vivo. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 163(4), 879-882.

Monoclonal antibody to the receptor for murine coronavirus MHV-A59 inhibits viral replication in vivo. / Smith, Abigail L.; Cardellichio, Christine B.; Winograd, Deborah F.; De Souza, Mark S.; Barthold, Stephen W; Holmes, Kathryn V.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 163, No. 4, 04.1991, p. 879-882.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, AL, Cardellichio, CB, Winograd, DF, De Souza, MS, Barthold, SW & Holmes, KV 1991, 'Monoclonal antibody to the receptor for murine coronavirus MHV-A59 inhibits viral replication in vivo', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 163, no. 4, pp. 879-882.
Smith, Abigail L. ; Cardellichio, Christine B. ; Winograd, Deborah F. ; De Souza, Mark S. ; Barthold, Stephen W ; Holmes, Kathryn V. / Monoclonal antibody to the receptor for murine coronavirus MHV-A59 inhibits viral replication in vivo. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1991 ; Vol. 163, No. 4. pp. 879-882.
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