Molecular characterization reveals distinct genospecies of Anaplasma phagocytophilum from diverse North American hosts

Daniel Rejmanek, Gideon Bradburd, Janet E Foley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging tick-borne pathogen that infects humans, domestic animals and wildlife throughout the Holarctic. In the far-western United States, multiple rodent species have been implicated as natural reservoirs for A. phagocytophilum. However, the presence of multiple A. phagocytophilum strains has made it difficult to determine which reservoir hosts pose the greatest risk to humans and domestic animals. Here we characterized three genetic markers (23S-5S rRNA intergenic spacer, ank and groESL) from 73 real-time TaqMan PCR-positive A. phagocytophilum strains infecting multiple rodent and reptile species, as well as a dog and a horse, from California. Bayesian and maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analyses of all three genetic markers consistently identified two major clades, one of which consisted of A. phagocytophilum strains infecting woodrats and the other consisting of strains infecting sciurids (chipmunks and squirrels) as well as the dog and horse strains. In addition, analysis of the 23S- 5S rRNA spacer region identified two unique and highly dissimilar clades of A. phagocytophilum strains infecting several lizard species. Our findings indicate that multiple unique strains of A. phagocytophilum with distinct host tropisms exist in California. Future epidemiological studies evaluating human and domestic animal risk should incorporate these distinctions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)204-212
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Medical Microbiology
Volume61
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2012

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Microbiology

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