Model of TGF-proximal tubule interactions in renal autoregulation

W. A. Cupples, Anthony S. Wexler, Donald J. Marsh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous models, assuming constant reabsorption in the proximal tubule, have shown that tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) can explain only a fraction of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal blood flow autoregulation. Increased arterial pressure inhibits proximal tubule fluid reabsorption, an effect that should increase the efficacy of TGF because of the resulting increased flow rate in the loop of Henle. Models describing pressure and flow in a glomerulus and a nephron were derived to test this prediction. The models were coupled by a TGF function with tubular flow rate at the end of the proximal tubule (superficial nephron) or at the macula densa (juxtamedullary nephron) as input and with afferent arteriolar resistance as output. In agreement with others, the model predicted that TGF alone could account for about one-half of autoregulation. Pressure-dependent inhibition of proximal reabsorption increased the ability of TGF to account for autoregulation, providing compensation for increases in arterial pressure comparable to published whole kidney values. The inclusion of an approximation of an effect of arterial pressure on TGF marginally improved predicted autoregulation. Although the results suggest that the proximal tubule-TGF interaction can provide a quantitatively adequate explanation for autoregulation, they also indicate that the effect of the interaction is spent at arterial pressures >130 mmHg. Additional mechanisms are required to extend this range.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Renal Fluid and Electrolyte Physiology
Volume259
Issue number4 28-4
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Homeostasis
Kidney
Nephrons
Arterial Pressure
Loop of Henle
Pressure
Renal Circulation
Glomerular Filtration Rate

Keywords

  • Glomerular capillary pressure
  • Glomerular filtration rate
  • Reabsorption
  • Renal blood flow

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Model of TGF-proximal tubule interactions in renal autoregulation. / Cupples, W. A.; Wexler, Anthony S.; Marsh, Donald J.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Renal Fluid and Electrolyte Physiology, Vol. 259, No. 4 28-4, 1990.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cupples, W. A. ; Wexler, Anthony S. ; Marsh, Donald J. / Model of TGF-proximal tubule interactions in renal autoregulation. In: American Journal of Physiology - Renal Fluid and Electrolyte Physiology. 1990 ; Vol. 259, No. 4 28-4.
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