Minimally Invasive Bone Grafting of Cysts of the Femoral Head and Acetabulum in Femoroacetabular Impingement

Arthroscopic Technique and Case Presentation

Amir A. Jamali, Anto T. Fritz, Deepak Reddy, John Meehan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) has been recently established as a risk factor in the development of osteoarthritis of the hip. Intraosseous cysts are commonly seen on imaging of FAI. In most cases these cysts are incidental and do not require specific treatment at the time of surgical treatment of hip impingement. However, in some cases the cysts may mechanically compromise the acetabular rim or femoral neck. We present a technique for treating such cysts with an all-arthroscopic technique using a commercially available bone graft substitute composed of cancellous bone and demineralized bone matrix placed within an arthroscopic cannula for direct delivery into the cysts. This technique may be of benefit to surgeons treating FAI with an all-arthroscopic technique.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-285
Number of pages7
JournalArthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2010

Fingerprint

Femoracetabular Impingement
Bone Cysts
Acetabulum
Bone Transplantation
Thigh
Cysts
Bone Substitutes
Hip Osteoarthritis
Bone Matrix
Femur Neck
Hip
Transplants
Bone and Bones
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

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abstract = "Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) has been recently established as a risk factor in the development of osteoarthritis of the hip. Intraosseous cysts are commonly seen on imaging of FAI. In most cases these cysts are incidental and do not require specific treatment at the time of surgical treatment of hip impingement. However, in some cases the cysts may mechanically compromise the acetabular rim or femoral neck. We present a technique for treating such cysts with an all-arthroscopic technique using a commercially available bone graft substitute composed of cancellous bone and demineralized bone matrix placed within an arthroscopic cannula for direct delivery into the cysts. This technique may be of benefit to surgeons treating FAI with an all-arthroscopic technique.",
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AU - Fritz, Anto T.

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AU - Meehan, John

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AB - Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) has been recently established as a risk factor in the development of osteoarthritis of the hip. Intraosseous cysts are commonly seen on imaging of FAI. In most cases these cysts are incidental and do not require specific treatment at the time of surgical treatment of hip impingement. However, in some cases the cysts may mechanically compromise the acetabular rim or femoral neck. We present a technique for treating such cysts with an all-arthroscopic technique using a commercially available bone graft substitute composed of cancellous bone and demineralized bone matrix placed within an arthroscopic cannula for direct delivery into the cysts. This technique may be of benefit to surgeons treating FAI with an all-arthroscopic technique.

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