Mineral metabolism in male cyclists during high-intensity endurance training

Rudolph H. Dressendorfer, Stewart R. Petersen, Shona E. Moss Lovshin, Carl L Keen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the effects of intense endurance training on basal plasma and 24-hour urinary calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), and copper (Cu) levels in 9 male competitive cyclists. The supervised training program followed a baseline period and included a volume phase (6 weeks, averaging 87% of maximal heart rate [HRmax]), an interval phase (18 days, 100% of HRmax), and a 10-day unloading taper. The primary training outcome measure was 20-km time-trial cycling performance. Subjects ate unrestricted diets and maintained their weight. Compared to baseline, performance improved significantly (p < .05), while mineral metabolism was not significantly different after the volume phase. However, after the interval phase, renal Ca excretion increased (p < .05) and plasma Ca fell slightly below the clinical norm. As compared to the interval phase, urinary Ca decreased (p < .05), plasma Ca increased (p < .05), and performance further improved (p < .05) after the taper. Whereas Mg, Fe, Zn, and Cu metabolism remained unchanged throughout the study, greater renal Ca excretion was associated with very high intensity interval training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-72
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition
Volume12
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

mineral metabolism
Minerals
Calcium
calcium
Magnesium
Zinc
magnesium
excretion
zinc
kidneys
education programs
heart rate
Copper
Iron
Heart Rate
copper
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
iron
Diet
Education

Keywords

  • Athletes
  • Endurance sports
  • Exercise
  • Nutrition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Food Science

Cite this

Dressendorfer, R. H., Petersen, S. R., Moss Lovshin, S. E., & Keen, C. L. (2002). Mineral metabolism in male cyclists during high-intensity endurance training. International Journal of Sport Nutrition, 12(1), 63-72.

Mineral metabolism in male cyclists during high-intensity endurance training. / Dressendorfer, Rudolph H.; Petersen, Stewart R.; Moss Lovshin, Shona E.; Keen, Carl L.

In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition, Vol. 12, No. 1, 2002, p. 63-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dressendorfer, RH, Petersen, SR, Moss Lovshin, SE & Keen, CL 2002, 'Mineral metabolism in male cyclists during high-intensity endurance training', International Journal of Sport Nutrition, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 63-72.
Dressendorfer RH, Petersen SR, Moss Lovshin SE, Keen CL. Mineral metabolism in male cyclists during high-intensity endurance training. International Journal of Sport Nutrition. 2002;12(1):63-72.
Dressendorfer, Rudolph H. ; Petersen, Stewart R. ; Moss Lovshin, Shona E. ; Keen, Carl L. / Mineral metabolism in male cyclists during high-intensity endurance training. In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition. 2002 ; Vol. 12, No. 1. pp. 63-72.
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