Mindfulness meditation training and self-referential processing in social anxiety disorder: Behavioral and neural effects

Philip R Goldin, Wiveka Ramel, James Gross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) on the brain-behavior mechanisms of self-referential processing in patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD). Sixteen patients underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while encoding self-referential, valence, and orthographic features of social trait adjectives. Post-MBSR, 14 patients completed neuroimaging. Compared to baseline, MBSR completers showed (a) increased self-esteem and decreased anxiety, (b) increased positive and decreased negative self-endorsement, (c) increased activity in a brain network related to attention regulation, and (d) reduced activity in brain systems implicated in conceptual-linguistic self-view. MBSR-related changes in maladaptive or distorted social self-view in adults diagnosed with SAD may be related to modulation of conceptual self-processing and attention regulation. Self-referential processing may serve as a functional biobehavioral target to measure the effects of mindfulness training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)242-256
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Cognitive Psychotherapy
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Clinical intervention
  • fMRI
  • Mindfulness
  • Self
  • Social anxiety disorder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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