Mifepristone pretreatment for the medical management of early pregnancy loss

Courtney A. Schreiber, Mitchell D Creinin, Jessica Atrio, Sarita Sonalkar, Sarah J. Ratcliffe, Kurt T. Barnhart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

BACKGROUND Medical management of early pregnancy loss is an alternative to uterine aspiration, but standard medical treatment with misoprostol commonly results in treatment failure. We compared the efficacy and safety of pretreatment with mifepristone followed by treatment with misoprostol with the efficacy and safety of misoprostol use alone for the management of early pregnancy loss. METHODS We randomly assigned 300 women who had an anembryonic gestation or in whom embryonic or fetal death was confirmed to receive pretreatment with 200 mg of mifepristone, administered orally, followed by 800 μg of misoprostol, administered vaginally (mifepristone-pretreatment group), or 800 μg of misoprostol alone, administered vaginally (misoprostol-alone group). Participants returned 1 to 4 days after misoprostol use for evaluation, including ultrasound examination, by an investigator who was unaware of the treatment-group assignments. Women in whom the gestational sac was not expelled were offered expectant management, a second dose of misoprostol, or uterine aspiration. We followed all participants for 30 days after randomization. Our primary outcome was gestational sac expulsion with one dose of misoprostol by the first follow-up visit and no additional intervention within 30 days after treatment. RESULTS Complete expulsion after one dose of misoprostol occurred in 124 of 148 women (83.8%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 76.8 to 89.3) in the mifepristone-pretreatment group and in 100 of 149 women (67.1%; 95% CI, 59.0 to 74.6) in the misoprostol-alone group (relative risk, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.43). Uterine aspiration was performed less frequently in the mifepristone-pretreatment group than in the misoprostol-alone group (8.8% vs. 23.5%; relative risk, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.21 to 0.68). Bleeding that resulted in blood transfusion occurred in 2.0% of the women in the mifepristone-pretreatment group and in 0.7% of the women in the misoprostolalone group (P = 0.31); pelvic infection was diagnosed in 1.3% of the women in each group. CONCLUSIONS Pretreatment with mifepristone followed by treatment with misoprostol resulted in a higher likelihood of successful management of first-trimester pregnancy loss than treatment with misoprostol alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2161-2170
Number of pages10
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume378
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 7 2018

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Misoprostol
Mifepristone
Pregnancy
Gestational Sac
Confidence Intervals
Therapeutics
Pelvic Infection
Safety
Fetal Death
First Pregnancy Trimester
Random Allocation
Treatment Failure
Blood Transfusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Schreiber, C. A., Creinin, M. D., Atrio, J., Sonalkar, S., Ratcliffe, S. J., & Barnhart, K. T. (2018). Mifepristone pretreatment for the medical management of early pregnancy loss. New England Journal of Medicine, 378(23), 2161-2170. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1715726

Mifepristone pretreatment for the medical management of early pregnancy loss. / Schreiber, Courtney A.; Creinin, Mitchell D; Atrio, Jessica; Sonalkar, Sarita; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Barnhart, Kurt T.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 378, No. 23, 07.06.2018, p. 2161-2170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schreiber, CA, Creinin, MD, Atrio, J, Sonalkar, S, Ratcliffe, SJ & Barnhart, KT 2018, 'Mifepristone pretreatment for the medical management of early pregnancy loss', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 378, no. 23, pp. 2161-2170. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1715726
Schreiber, Courtney A. ; Creinin, Mitchell D ; Atrio, Jessica ; Sonalkar, Sarita ; Ratcliffe, Sarah J. ; Barnhart, Kurt T. / Mifepristone pretreatment for the medical management of early pregnancy loss. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 378, No. 23. pp. 2161-2170.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND Medical management of early pregnancy loss is an alternative to uterine aspiration, but standard medical treatment with misoprostol commonly results in treatment failure. We compared the efficacy and safety of pretreatment with mifepristone followed by treatment with misoprostol with the efficacy and safety of misoprostol use alone for the management of early pregnancy loss. METHODS We randomly assigned 300 women who had an anembryonic gestation or in whom embryonic or fetal death was confirmed to receive pretreatment with 200 mg of mifepristone, administered orally, followed by 800 μg of misoprostol, administered vaginally (mifepristone-pretreatment group), or 800 μg of misoprostol alone, administered vaginally (misoprostol-alone group). Participants returned 1 to 4 days after misoprostol use for evaluation, including ultrasound examination, by an investigator who was unaware of the treatment-group assignments. Women in whom the gestational sac was not expelled were offered expectant management, a second dose of misoprostol, or uterine aspiration. We followed all participants for 30 days after randomization. Our primary outcome was gestational sac expulsion with one dose of misoprostol by the first follow-up visit and no additional intervention within 30 days after treatment. RESULTS Complete expulsion after one dose of misoprostol occurred in 124 of 148 women (83.8{\%}; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 76.8 to 89.3) in the mifepristone-pretreatment group and in 100 of 149 women (67.1{\%}; 95{\%} CI, 59.0 to 74.6) in the misoprostol-alone group (relative risk, 1.25; 95{\%} CI, 1.09 to 1.43). Uterine aspiration was performed less frequently in the mifepristone-pretreatment group than in the misoprostol-alone group (8.8{\%} vs. 23.5{\%}; relative risk, 0.37; 95{\%} CI, 0.21 to 0.68). Bleeding that resulted in blood transfusion occurred in 2.0{\%} of the women in the mifepristone-pretreatment group and in 0.7{\%} of the women in the misoprostolalone group (P = 0.31); pelvic infection was diagnosed in 1.3{\%} of the women in each group. CONCLUSIONS Pretreatment with mifepristone followed by treatment with misoprostol resulted in a higher likelihood of successful management of first-trimester pregnancy loss than treatment with misoprostol alone.",
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AU - Creinin, Mitchell D

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AU - Ratcliffe, Sarah J.

AU - Barnhart, Kurt T.

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N2 - BACKGROUND Medical management of early pregnancy loss is an alternative to uterine aspiration, but standard medical treatment with misoprostol commonly results in treatment failure. We compared the efficacy and safety of pretreatment with mifepristone followed by treatment with misoprostol with the efficacy and safety of misoprostol use alone for the management of early pregnancy loss. METHODS We randomly assigned 300 women who had an anembryonic gestation or in whom embryonic or fetal death was confirmed to receive pretreatment with 200 mg of mifepristone, administered orally, followed by 800 μg of misoprostol, administered vaginally (mifepristone-pretreatment group), or 800 μg of misoprostol alone, administered vaginally (misoprostol-alone group). Participants returned 1 to 4 days after misoprostol use for evaluation, including ultrasound examination, by an investigator who was unaware of the treatment-group assignments. Women in whom the gestational sac was not expelled were offered expectant management, a second dose of misoprostol, or uterine aspiration. We followed all participants for 30 days after randomization. Our primary outcome was gestational sac expulsion with one dose of misoprostol by the first follow-up visit and no additional intervention within 30 days after treatment. RESULTS Complete expulsion after one dose of misoprostol occurred in 124 of 148 women (83.8%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 76.8 to 89.3) in the mifepristone-pretreatment group and in 100 of 149 women (67.1%; 95% CI, 59.0 to 74.6) in the misoprostol-alone group (relative risk, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.43). Uterine aspiration was performed less frequently in the mifepristone-pretreatment group than in the misoprostol-alone group (8.8% vs. 23.5%; relative risk, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.21 to 0.68). Bleeding that resulted in blood transfusion occurred in 2.0% of the women in the mifepristone-pretreatment group and in 0.7% of the women in the misoprostolalone group (P = 0.31); pelvic infection was diagnosed in 1.3% of the women in each group. CONCLUSIONS Pretreatment with mifepristone followed by treatment with misoprostol resulted in a higher likelihood of successful management of first-trimester pregnancy loss than treatment with misoprostol alone.

AB - BACKGROUND Medical management of early pregnancy loss is an alternative to uterine aspiration, but standard medical treatment with misoprostol commonly results in treatment failure. We compared the efficacy and safety of pretreatment with mifepristone followed by treatment with misoprostol with the efficacy and safety of misoprostol use alone for the management of early pregnancy loss. METHODS We randomly assigned 300 women who had an anembryonic gestation or in whom embryonic or fetal death was confirmed to receive pretreatment with 200 mg of mifepristone, administered orally, followed by 800 μg of misoprostol, administered vaginally (mifepristone-pretreatment group), or 800 μg of misoprostol alone, administered vaginally (misoprostol-alone group). Participants returned 1 to 4 days after misoprostol use for evaluation, including ultrasound examination, by an investigator who was unaware of the treatment-group assignments. Women in whom the gestational sac was not expelled were offered expectant management, a second dose of misoprostol, or uterine aspiration. We followed all participants for 30 days after randomization. Our primary outcome was gestational sac expulsion with one dose of misoprostol by the first follow-up visit and no additional intervention within 30 days after treatment. RESULTS Complete expulsion after one dose of misoprostol occurred in 124 of 148 women (83.8%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 76.8 to 89.3) in the mifepristone-pretreatment group and in 100 of 149 women (67.1%; 95% CI, 59.0 to 74.6) in the misoprostol-alone group (relative risk, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.43). Uterine aspiration was performed less frequently in the mifepristone-pretreatment group than in the misoprostol-alone group (8.8% vs. 23.5%; relative risk, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.21 to 0.68). Bleeding that resulted in blood transfusion occurred in 2.0% of the women in the mifepristone-pretreatment group and in 0.7% of the women in the misoprostolalone group (P = 0.31); pelvic infection was diagnosed in 1.3% of the women in each group. CONCLUSIONS Pretreatment with mifepristone followed by treatment with misoprostol resulted in a higher likelihood of successful management of first-trimester pregnancy loss than treatment with misoprostol alone.

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