Microtubule motors in mitosis

David J. Sharp, Gregory C. Rogers, Jonathan M. Scholey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

434 Scopus citations

Abstract

The mitotic spindle uses microtubule-based motor proteins to assemble itself and to segregate sister chromatids. It is becoming clear that motors invoke several distinct mechanisms to generate the forces that drive mitosis. Moreover, in carrying out its function, the spindle appears to pass through a series of transient steady-state structures, each established by a delicate balance of forces generated by multiple complementary and antagonistic motors. Transitions from one steady state to the next can occur when a change in the activity of a subset of mitotic motors tips the balance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-47
Number of pages7
JournalNature
Volume407
Issue number6800
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

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    Sharp, D. J., Rogers, G. C., & Scholey, J. M. (2000). Microtubule motors in mitosis. Nature, 407(6800), 41-47. https://doi.org/10.1038/35024000