Micronutrient status during lactation in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected South African women during the first 6 mo after delivery

Peggy C. Papathakis, Nigel C. Rollins, Caroline J Chantry, Michael L. Bennish, Kenneth H. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Little information on the micronutrient status of HIV-infected (HIV-positive) breastfeeding women is available. Objective: The objective was to compare the protein and micronutrient status of South African breastfeeding women by HIV status. Design: Serum albumin, prealbumin, vitamin B-12, folate, retinol, α-tocopherol, hemoglobin, ferritin, and zinc concentrations were compared between 92 HIV-positive and 52 HIV-uninfected (HIV-negative) mothers 6, 14, and 24 wk after delivery. C-reactive protein and α1-acid glycoprotein were used as proxy indicators of an inflammatory process. Results: Mean albumin and prealbumin were significantly lower in HIV-positive mothers, and a higher proportion of HIV-positive mothers had low albumin concentrations (<35 g/L). Less than 45% of the mothers were vitamin B-12 or folate sufficient. Significantly more HIV-positive (70.5%) than HIV-negative (46.2%) mothers had marginal vitamin B-12 status (P < 0.05), and mean folate concentrations were lower in HIV-positive mothers (P = 0.05). Mean serum retinol was significantly lower in HIV-positive mothers, even after control for the acute phase response. At 24 wk, 70% of both groups had an α-tocopherol deficiency (<11.6 μmol/L), but no significant difference by HIV status was observed. More HIV-positive (33.3%) than HIV-negative (8.7%) mothers had anemia (P = 0.018), whereas 25% of all mothers had low serum ferritin concentrations. After the acute phase response was controlled for, zinc deficiency was more common in HIV-positive (45.0%) than in HIV-negative (25.0%) mothers (P = 0.05). Conclusions: Deficiencies in vitamins B-12, folate, α-tocopherol, ferritin, and zinc are common in South African breastfeeding mothers. HIV-positive mothers had lower mean serum concentrations of albumin, prealbumin, folate, retinol, and hemoglobin than did HIV-negative mothers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)182-192
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume85
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

Keywords

  • Breastfeeding women
  • HIV infection
  • Micronutrient status
  • South Africa

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

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