Mexican-American families and dementia: An exploration of “work” in response to dementia-related aggressive behavior

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Managing dementia-related behavioral problems at home is of significance for both care-recipients and caregivers as well as more generally for public health. Examining how Mexican-American families respond in the home when the person with dementia displays aggressive behavior provides a unique opportunity to understand how they accomplish the work involved in managing illness. The aims of this study were (a) to describe the socio-cultural context in which dementia-related aggressive behavior takes places, and (b) to describe the work that Mexican-American families do to manage dementia-related aggressive behavior. This is an ethnographic study involving participant observation of Mexican-American families caring for a person with dementia at home. Findings show that there is variation in how families accomplish illness work when dementia-related aggressive behavior disrupts everyday caregiving. The types of work performed by families under these strenuous and stressful situations likely result from a confluence of gender and generational differences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAging, Health, and Longevity in the Mexican-Origin Population
PublisherSpringer US
Pages277-291
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)9781461418672
ISBN (Print)9781461418665
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

aggressive behavior
dementia
Dementia
illness
human being
caregiving
participant observation
Caregivers
caregiver
recipient
Public Health
public health
Observation
gender

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Mexican-American families and dementia : An exploration of “work” in response to dementia-related aggressive behavior. / Apesoa-Varano, Ester Carolina; Barker, Judith C.; Hinton, W Ladson.

Aging, Health, and Longevity in the Mexican-Origin Population. Springer US, 2012. p. 277-291.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Apesoa-Varano, Ester Carolina ; Barker, Judith C. ; Hinton, W Ladson. / Mexican-American families and dementia : An exploration of “work” in response to dementia-related aggressive behavior. Aging, Health, and Longevity in the Mexican-Origin Population. Springer US, 2012. pp. 277-291
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