Metallic foreign bodies in the orbits of patients undergoing MR imaging: Prevalence and value of radiography and CT before MR

M. R. Williamson, M. C. Espinosa, Robert D Boutin, W. W. Orrison, B. L. Hart, C. A. Kelsey, F. G. Shellock, E. Kanal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to measure the prevalence of metallic foreign bodies in the orbits of 15,024 patients who were scheduled for MR imaging during a 4-year period and to determine if screening by plain radiography, CT, or both before MR imaging is efficacious. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Records of 15,024 patients scheduled for MR imaging were reviewed. A total of 1593 patients who had identified themselves as being at risk for an intraorbital metallic foreign body had undergone plain radiography or CT of the orbits. Plain radiographs and/or CT scans of patients reported as having orbital metal were reviewed to confirm the presence of a metallic foreign body and to identify its location. RESULTS. Metallic foreign bodies were discovered in 40 patients. Six of these patients had impaired vision in the involved eye. Ten patients had a metallic foreign body in or near the orbit but well away from the globe and were thought to be at low risk for movement of the foreign body as a result of MR imaging. The other 24 patients had metallic foreign bodies adjacent to or within the globe and were thought to be at risk for movement of the metallic foreign body as a result of MR imaging. CONCLUSION. The prevalence of intraorbital metallic foreign bodies in our study population was low (0.27%). Even in those patients identified as being at risk, the prevalence was only 2.5%. Based on the number of MR examinations performed annually in the United States and on data indicating that no radiographic screening is performed at 5% of institutions, we extrapolate that more than 2400 patients with intraorbital metallic foreign bodies have undergone MR imaging since 1986 without report of injury. These data allow us to infer that the risk of eye damage for patients who have intraorbital metal is low and that radiographic screening before MR imaging is not needed as often as it is done.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)981-986
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume162
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Orbit
Foreign Bodies
Radiography
Metals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Williamson, M. R., Espinosa, M. C., Boutin, R. D., Orrison, W. W., Hart, B. L., Kelsey, C. A., ... Kanal, E. (1994). Metallic foreign bodies in the orbits of patients undergoing MR imaging: Prevalence and value of radiography and CT before MR. American Journal of Roentgenology, 162(4), 981-986.

Metallic foreign bodies in the orbits of patients undergoing MR imaging : Prevalence and value of radiography and CT before MR. / Williamson, M. R.; Espinosa, M. C.; Boutin, Robert D; Orrison, W. W.; Hart, B. L.; Kelsey, C. A.; Shellock, F. G.; Kanal, E.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 162, No. 4, 1994, p. 981-986.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Williamson, MR, Espinosa, MC, Boutin, RD, Orrison, WW, Hart, BL, Kelsey, CA, Shellock, FG & Kanal, E 1994, 'Metallic foreign bodies in the orbits of patients undergoing MR imaging: Prevalence and value of radiography and CT before MR', American Journal of Roentgenology, vol. 162, no. 4, pp. 981-986.
Williamson, M. R. ; Espinosa, M. C. ; Boutin, Robert D ; Orrison, W. W. ; Hart, B. L. ; Kelsey, C. A. ; Shellock, F. G. ; Kanal, E. / Metallic foreign bodies in the orbits of patients undergoing MR imaging : Prevalence and value of radiography and CT before MR. In: American Journal of Roentgenology. 1994 ; Vol. 162, No. 4. pp. 981-986.
@article{c5af57cddf43461f9c6c6e25a1bf5ae0,
title = "Metallic foreign bodies in the orbits of patients undergoing MR imaging: Prevalence and value of radiography and CT before MR",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to measure the prevalence of metallic foreign bodies in the orbits of 15,024 patients who were scheduled for MR imaging during a 4-year period and to determine if screening by plain radiography, CT, or both before MR imaging is efficacious. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Records of 15,024 patients scheduled for MR imaging were reviewed. A total of 1593 patients who had identified themselves as being at risk for an intraorbital metallic foreign body had undergone plain radiography or CT of the orbits. Plain radiographs and/or CT scans of patients reported as having orbital metal were reviewed to confirm the presence of a metallic foreign body and to identify its location. RESULTS. Metallic foreign bodies were discovered in 40 patients. Six of these patients had impaired vision in the involved eye. Ten patients had a metallic foreign body in or near the orbit but well away from the globe and were thought to be at low risk for movement of the foreign body as a result of MR imaging. The other 24 patients had metallic foreign bodies adjacent to or within the globe and were thought to be at risk for movement of the metallic foreign body as a result of MR imaging. CONCLUSION. The prevalence of intraorbital metallic foreign bodies in our study population was low (0.27{\%}). Even in those patients identified as being at risk, the prevalence was only 2.5{\%}. Based on the number of MR examinations performed annually in the United States and on data indicating that no radiographic screening is performed at 5{\%} of institutions, we extrapolate that more than 2400 patients with intraorbital metallic foreign bodies have undergone MR imaging since 1986 without report of injury. These data allow us to infer that the risk of eye damage for patients who have intraorbital metal is low and that radiographic screening before MR imaging is not needed as often as it is done.",
author = "Williamson, {M. R.} and Espinosa, {M. C.} and Boutin, {Robert D} and Orrison, {W. W.} and Hart, {B. L.} and Kelsey, {C. A.} and Shellock, {F. G.} and E. Kanal",
year = "1994",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "162",
pages = "981--986",
journal = "American Journal of Roentgenology",
issn = "0361-803X",
publisher = "American Roentgen Ray Society",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metallic foreign bodies in the orbits of patients undergoing MR imaging

T2 - Prevalence and value of radiography and CT before MR

AU - Williamson, M. R.

AU - Espinosa, M. C.

AU - Boutin, Robert D

AU - Orrison, W. W.

AU - Hart, B. L.

AU - Kelsey, C. A.

AU - Shellock, F. G.

AU - Kanal, E.

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to measure the prevalence of metallic foreign bodies in the orbits of 15,024 patients who were scheduled for MR imaging during a 4-year period and to determine if screening by plain radiography, CT, or both before MR imaging is efficacious. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Records of 15,024 patients scheduled for MR imaging were reviewed. A total of 1593 patients who had identified themselves as being at risk for an intraorbital metallic foreign body had undergone plain radiography or CT of the orbits. Plain radiographs and/or CT scans of patients reported as having orbital metal were reviewed to confirm the presence of a metallic foreign body and to identify its location. RESULTS. Metallic foreign bodies were discovered in 40 patients. Six of these patients had impaired vision in the involved eye. Ten patients had a metallic foreign body in or near the orbit but well away from the globe and were thought to be at low risk for movement of the foreign body as a result of MR imaging. The other 24 patients had metallic foreign bodies adjacent to or within the globe and were thought to be at risk for movement of the metallic foreign body as a result of MR imaging. CONCLUSION. The prevalence of intraorbital metallic foreign bodies in our study population was low (0.27%). Even in those patients identified as being at risk, the prevalence was only 2.5%. Based on the number of MR examinations performed annually in the United States and on data indicating that no radiographic screening is performed at 5% of institutions, we extrapolate that more than 2400 patients with intraorbital metallic foreign bodies have undergone MR imaging since 1986 without report of injury. These data allow us to infer that the risk of eye damage for patients who have intraorbital metal is low and that radiographic screening before MR imaging is not needed as often as it is done.

AB - OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to measure the prevalence of metallic foreign bodies in the orbits of 15,024 patients who were scheduled for MR imaging during a 4-year period and to determine if screening by plain radiography, CT, or both before MR imaging is efficacious. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Records of 15,024 patients scheduled for MR imaging were reviewed. A total of 1593 patients who had identified themselves as being at risk for an intraorbital metallic foreign body had undergone plain radiography or CT of the orbits. Plain radiographs and/or CT scans of patients reported as having orbital metal were reviewed to confirm the presence of a metallic foreign body and to identify its location. RESULTS. Metallic foreign bodies were discovered in 40 patients. Six of these patients had impaired vision in the involved eye. Ten patients had a metallic foreign body in or near the orbit but well away from the globe and were thought to be at low risk for movement of the foreign body as a result of MR imaging. The other 24 patients had metallic foreign bodies adjacent to or within the globe and were thought to be at risk for movement of the metallic foreign body as a result of MR imaging. CONCLUSION. The prevalence of intraorbital metallic foreign bodies in our study population was low (0.27%). Even in those patients identified as being at risk, the prevalence was only 2.5%. Based on the number of MR examinations performed annually in the United States and on data indicating that no radiographic screening is performed at 5% of institutions, we extrapolate that more than 2400 patients with intraorbital metallic foreign bodies have undergone MR imaging since 1986 without report of injury. These data allow us to infer that the risk of eye damage for patients who have intraorbital metal is low and that radiographic screening before MR imaging is not needed as often as it is done.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028197545&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028197545&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8141030

AN - SCOPUS:0028197545

VL - 162

SP - 981

EP - 986

JO - American Journal of Roentgenology

JF - American Journal of Roentgenology

SN - 0361-803X

IS - 4

ER -