Metabolomics in psoriatic disease

Pilot study reveals metabolite differences in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis

April W. Armstrong, Julie Wu, Mary Ann Johnson, Dmitry Grapov, Baktazh Azizi, Jaskaran Dhillon, Oliver Fiehn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Importance: While "omics? studies have advanced our understanding of inflammatory skin diseases, metabolomics is mostly an unexplored field in dermatology. Objective: We sought to elucidate the pathogenesis of psoriatic diseases by determining the differences in metabolomic profiles among psoriasis patients with or without psoriatic arthritis and healthy controls. Design: We employed a global metabolomics approach to compare circulating metabolites from patients with psoriasis, psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, and healthy controls. Setting: Study participants were recruited from the general community and from the Psoriasis Clinic at the University of California Davis in United States. Participants: We examined metabolomic profiles using blood serum samples from 30 patients age and gender matched into three groups: 10 patients with psoriasis, 10 patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and 10 control participants. Main outcome(s) and measures(s): Metabolite levels were measured calculating the mean peak intensities from gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Results: Multivariate analyses of metabolomics profiles revealed altered serum metabolites among the study population. Compared to control patients, psoriasis patients had a higher level of alpha ketoglutaric acid (Pso: 288 ± 88; Control: 209 ± 69; p=0.03), a lower level of asparagine (Pso: 5460 ± 980; Control: 7260 ± 2100; p=0.02), and a lower level of glutamine (Pso: 86000 ± 20000; Control: 111000 ± 27000; p=0.02). Compared to control patients, patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis had increased levels of glucuronic acid (Pso + PsA: 638 ± 250; Control: 347 ± 61; p=0.001). Compared to patients with psoriasis alone, patients with both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis had a decreased level of alpha ketoglutaric acid (Pso + PsA: 186 ± 80; Pso: 288 ± 88; p=0.02) and an increased level of lignoceric acid (Pso + PsA: 442 ± 280; Pso: 214 ± 64; p=0.02). Conclusions and relevance: The metabolite differences help elucidate the pathogenesis of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and they may provide insights for therapeutic development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalF1000Research
Volume3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 21 2014

Fingerprint

Psoriatic Arthritis
Metabolomics
Metabolites
Psoriasis
Dermatology
Glucuronic Acid
Asparagine
Glutamine
Gas chromatography
Mass spectrometry
Skin
Serum
Skin Diseases
Blood
Gas Chromatography
Mass Spectrometry
Multivariate Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Metabolomics in psoriatic disease : Pilot study reveals metabolite differences in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. / Armstrong, April W.; Wu, Julie; Johnson, Mary Ann; Grapov, Dmitry; Azizi, Baktazh; Dhillon, Jaskaran; Fiehn, Oliver.

In: F1000Research, Vol. 3, 21.10.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Armstrong, April W. ; Wu, Julie ; Johnson, Mary Ann ; Grapov, Dmitry ; Azizi, Baktazh ; Dhillon, Jaskaran ; Fiehn, Oliver. / Metabolomics in psoriatic disease : Pilot study reveals metabolite differences in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. In: F1000Research. 2014 ; Vol. 3.
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abstract = "Importance: While {"}omics? studies have advanced our understanding of inflammatory skin diseases, metabolomics is mostly an unexplored field in dermatology. Objective: We sought to elucidate the pathogenesis of psoriatic diseases by determining the differences in metabolomic profiles among psoriasis patients with or without psoriatic arthritis and healthy controls. Design: We employed a global metabolomics approach to compare circulating metabolites from patients with psoriasis, psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, and healthy controls. Setting: Study participants were recruited from the general community and from the Psoriasis Clinic at the University of California Davis in United States. Participants: We examined metabolomic profiles using blood serum samples from 30 patients age and gender matched into three groups: 10 patients with psoriasis, 10 patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and 10 control participants. Main outcome(s) and measures(s): Metabolite levels were measured calculating the mean peak intensities from gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Results: Multivariate analyses of metabolomics profiles revealed altered serum metabolites among the study population. Compared to control patients, psoriasis patients had a higher level of alpha ketoglutaric acid (Pso: 288 ± 88; Control: 209 ± 69; p=0.03), a lower level of asparagine (Pso: 5460 ± 980; Control: 7260 ± 2100; p=0.02), and a lower level of glutamine (Pso: 86000 ± 20000; Control: 111000 ± 27000; p=0.02). Compared to control patients, patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis had increased levels of glucuronic acid (Pso + PsA: 638 ± 250; Control: 347 ± 61; p=0.001). Compared to patients with psoriasis alone, patients with both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis had a decreased level of alpha ketoglutaric acid (Pso + PsA: 186 ± 80; Pso: 288 ± 88; p=0.02) and an increased level of lignoceric acid (Pso + PsA: 442 ± 280; Pso: 214 ± 64; p=0.02). Conclusions and relevance: The metabolite differences help elucidate the pathogenesis of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and they may provide insights for therapeutic development.",
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AU - Azizi, Baktazh

AU - Dhillon, Jaskaran

AU - Fiehn, Oliver

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