Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants

Andrew D. Hanson, Christopher S. Henry, Oliver Fiehn, Valérie De Crécy-Lagard

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-152
Number of pages22
JournalAnnual Review of Plant Biology
Volume67
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 29 2016

Keywords

  • Cheminformatics
  • Comparative genomics
  • Damage preemption
  • Damage repair
  • Directed overflow
  • Metabolomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Plant Science
  • Cell Biology

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