Metabolic Syndrome and Associated Diseases: From the Bench to the Clinic

Donna L. Mendrick, Anna Mae Diehl, Lisa S. Topor, Rodney R. Dietert, Yvonne Will, Michele La Merrill, Sebastien Bouret, Vijayalaskshmi Varma, Kenneth L. Hastings, Thaddeus T. Schug, Susan G. Emeigh Hart, Florence G. Burleson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Metabolic Syndrome and Associated Diseases: From the Bench to the Clinic, a Society of Toxicology Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology (CCT) workshop was held on March 11, 2017. The meeting was convened to raise awareness of metabolic syndrome and its associated diseases and serve as a melting pot with scientists of multiple disciplines (eg, toxicologists, clinicians, regulators) so as to spur research and understanding of this condition. The criteria for metabolic syndrome include obesity, dyslipidemia (low high-density lipoprotein and/or elevated triglycerides), elevated blood pressure, and alterations in glucose metabolism. It can lead to a greater potential of type 2 diabetes, lipid disorders, cardiovascular disease, hepatic steatosis, and other circulatory disorders. Although there are no approved drugs specifically for this syndrome, many drugs target diseases associated with this syndrome thus potentially increasing the likelihood of drug-drug interactions. There is currently significant research focusing on understanding the key pathways that control metabolism, which would be likely targets of risk factors (eg, exposure to xenobiotics, genetics) and lifestyle factors (eg, microbiome, nutrition, and exercise) that contribute to metabolic syndrome. Understanding these pathways could also lead to the development of pharmaceutical interventions. As individuals with metabolic syndrome have signs similar to that of toxic responses (eg, oxidative stress and inflammation) and organ dysfunction, these alterations should be taken into account in drug development. With the increasing frequency of metabolic syndrome in the general population, the idea of a "normal" individual may need to be redefined. This paper reports on the substance and outcomes of this workshop.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)36-42
Number of pages7
JournalToxicological sciences : an official journal of the Society of Toxicology
Volume162
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

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Pharmaceutical Preparations
Metabolism
Drug interactions
Oxidative stress
Poisons
Blood pressure
Xenobiotics
HDL Lipoproteins
Nutrition
Medical problems
Education
Triglycerides
Microbiota
Lipids
Glucose
Dyslipidemias
Drug Interactions
LDL Lipoproteins
Research
Toxicology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology

Cite this

Metabolic Syndrome and Associated Diseases : From the Bench to the Clinic. / Mendrick, Donna L.; Diehl, Anna Mae; Topor, Lisa S.; Dietert, Rodney R.; Will, Yvonne; La Merrill, Michele; Bouret, Sebastien; Varma, Vijayalaskshmi; Hastings, Kenneth L.; Schug, Thaddeus T.; Emeigh Hart, Susan G.; Burleson, Florence G.

In: Toxicological sciences : an official journal of the Society of Toxicology, Vol. 162, No. 1, 01.03.2018, p. 36-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Mendrick, DL, Diehl, AM, Topor, LS, Dietert, RR, Will, Y, La Merrill, M, Bouret, S, Varma, V, Hastings, KL, Schug, TT, Emeigh Hart, SG & Burleson, FG 2018, 'Metabolic Syndrome and Associated Diseases: From the Bench to the Clinic', Toxicological sciences : an official journal of the Society of Toxicology, vol. 162, no. 1, pp. 36-42. https://doi.org/10.1093/toxsci/kfx233
Mendrick, Donna L. ; Diehl, Anna Mae ; Topor, Lisa S. ; Dietert, Rodney R. ; Will, Yvonne ; La Merrill, Michele ; Bouret, Sebastien ; Varma, Vijayalaskshmi ; Hastings, Kenneth L. ; Schug, Thaddeus T. ; Emeigh Hart, Susan G. ; Burleson, Florence G. / Metabolic Syndrome and Associated Diseases : From the Bench to the Clinic. In: Toxicological sciences : an official journal of the Society of Toxicology. 2018 ; Vol. 162, No. 1. pp. 36-42.
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