Metabolic responses to prolonged consumption of glucose- and fructose-sweetened beverages are not associated with postprandial or 24-h glucose and insulin excursions

Kimber Stanhope, Steven C. Griffen, Andrew A. Bremer, Roel G. Vink, Ernst J. Schaefer, Katsuyuki Nakajima, Jean Marc Schwarz, Carine Beysen, Lars Berglund, Nancy L. Keim, Peter J Havel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages has been shown to be associated with dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, fatty liver, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. It has been proposed that adverse metabolic effects of chronic consumption of sugarsweetened beverages are a consequence of increased circulating glucose and insulin excursions, ie, dietary glycemic index (GI). Objective: We determined whether the greater adverse effects of fructose than of glucose consumption were associated with glucose and insulin exposures. Design: The subjects were studied in a metabolic facility and consumed energy-balanced diets containing 55% of energy as complex carbohydrate for 2 wk (GI = 64). The subjects then consumed 25% of energy requirements as fructose- or glucose-sweetened beverages along with their usual ad libitum diets for 8 wk at home and then as part of energy-balanced diets for 2 wk at the metabolic facility (fructose GI = 38, glucose GI = 83). The 24-h glucose and insulin profiles and fasting plasma glycated albumin and fructosamine concentrations were measured 0, 2, 8, and 10 wk after beverage consumption. Results: Consumption of fructose-sweetened beverages lowered glucose and insulin postmeal peaks and the 23-h area under the curve compared with the baseline diet and with the consumption of glucose-sweetened beverages (all P < 0.001, effect of sugar). Plasma glycated albumin concentrations were lower 10 wk after fructose than after glucose consumption (P < 0.01, effect of sugar), whereas fructosamine concentrations did not differ between groups. Conclusion: The results suggest that the specific effects of fructose, but not of glucose and insulin excursions, contribute to the adverse effects of consuming sugar-sweetened beverages on lipids and insulin sensitivity. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01165853.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)112-119
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume94
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011

Fingerprint

Beverages
Fructose
Insulin
Glucose
Glycemic Index
Fructosamine
Diet
Serum Albumin
Insulin Resistance
Fatty Liver
Dyslipidemias
Area Under Curve
Liver Diseases
Fasting
Cardiovascular Diseases
Carbohydrates
Lipids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Metabolic responses to prolonged consumption of glucose- and fructose-sweetened beverages are not associated with postprandial or 24-h glucose and insulin excursions. / Stanhope, Kimber; Griffen, Steven C.; Bremer, Andrew A.; Vink, Roel G.; Schaefer, Ernst J.; Nakajima, Katsuyuki; Schwarz, Jean Marc; Beysen, Carine; Berglund, Lars; Keim, Nancy L.; Havel, Peter J.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 94, No. 1, 01.07.2011, p. 112-119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stanhope, Kimber ; Griffen, Steven C. ; Bremer, Andrew A. ; Vink, Roel G. ; Schaefer, Ernst J. ; Nakajima, Katsuyuki ; Schwarz, Jean Marc ; Beysen, Carine ; Berglund, Lars ; Keim, Nancy L. ; Havel, Peter J. / Metabolic responses to prolonged consumption of glucose- and fructose-sweetened beverages are not associated with postprandial or 24-h glucose and insulin excursions. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2011 ; Vol. 94, No. 1. pp. 112-119.
@article{8bb43ea115d24e64a2b3cafca21c0365,
title = "Metabolic responses to prolonged consumption of glucose- and fructose-sweetened beverages are not associated with postprandial or 24-h glucose and insulin excursions",
abstract = "Background: Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages has been shown to be associated with dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, fatty liver, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. It has been proposed that adverse metabolic effects of chronic consumption of sugarsweetened beverages are a consequence of increased circulating glucose and insulin excursions, ie, dietary glycemic index (GI). Objective: We determined whether the greater adverse effects of fructose than of glucose consumption were associated with glucose and insulin exposures. Design: The subjects were studied in a metabolic facility and consumed energy-balanced diets containing 55{\%} of energy as complex carbohydrate for 2 wk (GI = 64). The subjects then consumed 25{\%} of energy requirements as fructose- or glucose-sweetened beverages along with their usual ad libitum diets for 8 wk at home and then as part of energy-balanced diets for 2 wk at the metabolic facility (fructose GI = 38, glucose GI = 83). The 24-h glucose and insulin profiles and fasting plasma glycated albumin and fructosamine concentrations were measured 0, 2, 8, and 10 wk after beverage consumption. Results: Consumption of fructose-sweetened beverages lowered glucose and insulin postmeal peaks and the 23-h area under the curve compared with the baseline diet and with the consumption of glucose-sweetened beverages (all P < 0.001, effect of sugar). Plasma glycated albumin concentrations were lower 10 wk after fructose than after glucose consumption (P < 0.01, effect of sugar), whereas fructosamine concentrations did not differ between groups. Conclusion: The results suggest that the specific effects of fructose, but not of glucose and insulin excursions, contribute to the adverse effects of consuming sugar-sweetened beverages on lipids and insulin sensitivity. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01165853.",
author = "Kimber Stanhope and Griffen, {Steven C.} and Bremer, {Andrew A.} and Vink, {Roel G.} and Schaefer, {Ernst J.} and Katsuyuki Nakajima and Schwarz, {Jean Marc} and Carine Beysen and Lars Berglund and Keim, {Nancy L.} and Havel, {Peter J}",
year = "2011",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3945/ajcn.110.002246",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "94",
pages = "112--119",
journal = "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0002-9165",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metabolic responses to prolonged consumption of glucose- and fructose-sweetened beverages are not associated with postprandial or 24-h glucose and insulin excursions

AU - Stanhope, Kimber

AU - Griffen, Steven C.

AU - Bremer, Andrew A.

AU - Vink, Roel G.

AU - Schaefer, Ernst J.

AU - Nakajima, Katsuyuki

AU - Schwarz, Jean Marc

AU - Beysen, Carine

AU - Berglund, Lars

AU - Keim, Nancy L.

AU - Havel, Peter J

PY - 2011/7/1

Y1 - 2011/7/1

N2 - Background: Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages has been shown to be associated with dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, fatty liver, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. It has been proposed that adverse metabolic effects of chronic consumption of sugarsweetened beverages are a consequence of increased circulating glucose and insulin excursions, ie, dietary glycemic index (GI). Objective: We determined whether the greater adverse effects of fructose than of glucose consumption were associated with glucose and insulin exposures. Design: The subjects were studied in a metabolic facility and consumed energy-balanced diets containing 55% of energy as complex carbohydrate for 2 wk (GI = 64). The subjects then consumed 25% of energy requirements as fructose- or glucose-sweetened beverages along with their usual ad libitum diets for 8 wk at home and then as part of energy-balanced diets for 2 wk at the metabolic facility (fructose GI = 38, glucose GI = 83). The 24-h glucose and insulin profiles and fasting plasma glycated albumin and fructosamine concentrations were measured 0, 2, 8, and 10 wk after beverage consumption. Results: Consumption of fructose-sweetened beverages lowered glucose and insulin postmeal peaks and the 23-h area under the curve compared with the baseline diet and with the consumption of glucose-sweetened beverages (all P < 0.001, effect of sugar). Plasma glycated albumin concentrations were lower 10 wk after fructose than after glucose consumption (P < 0.01, effect of sugar), whereas fructosamine concentrations did not differ between groups. Conclusion: The results suggest that the specific effects of fructose, but not of glucose and insulin excursions, contribute to the adverse effects of consuming sugar-sweetened beverages on lipids and insulin sensitivity. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01165853.

AB - Background: Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages has been shown to be associated with dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, fatty liver, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. It has been proposed that adverse metabolic effects of chronic consumption of sugarsweetened beverages are a consequence of increased circulating glucose and insulin excursions, ie, dietary glycemic index (GI). Objective: We determined whether the greater adverse effects of fructose than of glucose consumption were associated with glucose and insulin exposures. Design: The subjects were studied in a metabolic facility and consumed energy-balanced diets containing 55% of energy as complex carbohydrate for 2 wk (GI = 64). The subjects then consumed 25% of energy requirements as fructose- or glucose-sweetened beverages along with their usual ad libitum diets for 8 wk at home and then as part of energy-balanced diets for 2 wk at the metabolic facility (fructose GI = 38, glucose GI = 83). The 24-h glucose and insulin profiles and fasting plasma glycated albumin and fructosamine concentrations were measured 0, 2, 8, and 10 wk after beverage consumption. Results: Consumption of fructose-sweetened beverages lowered glucose and insulin postmeal peaks and the 23-h area under the curve compared with the baseline diet and with the consumption of glucose-sweetened beverages (all P < 0.001, effect of sugar). Plasma glycated albumin concentrations were lower 10 wk after fructose than after glucose consumption (P < 0.01, effect of sugar), whereas fructosamine concentrations did not differ between groups. Conclusion: The results suggest that the specific effects of fructose, but not of glucose and insulin excursions, contribute to the adverse effects of consuming sugar-sweetened beverages on lipids and insulin sensitivity. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01165853.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79959443030&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79959443030&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3945/ajcn.110.002246

DO - 10.3945/ajcn.110.002246

M3 - Article

C2 - 21613559

AN - SCOPUS:79959443030

VL - 94

SP - 112

EP - 119

JO - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 1

ER -