Metabolic, inflammatory, and microvascular determinants of white matter disease and cognitive decline

Maggie Wang, Jennifer E. Norman, Vivek Srinivasan, John C Rutledge

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

White Matter Disease is increasingly being recognized as an important cause of cognitive decline and dementia. Various investigations have linked chronic diet-related conditions to the development of white matter lesions, which appear as white matter hyperintensities on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the brain. Thus, it can be postulated that the metabolic, inflammatory, and microvascular changes accompanying a western diet, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus type II (DMII) are potential mediators in the development and progression of white matter disease, which in turn contributes to the development and progression of cognitive decline. This review will examine evidence for potential metabolic, inflammatory, and microvascular determinants of white matter disease and cognitive decline. Specifically, we will focus on the effects of altered insulin signaling in diabetes, obesity-induced oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, arterial stiffness due to hypertension, ischemia secondary to cerebral small vessel disease, and blood brain barrier disturbances.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberAJND0041505
Pages (from-to)171-177
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Neurodegenerative Diseases
Volume5
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Dementia
  • Inflammation
  • Neurodegenerative disorders
  • Vascular biology
  • Western diet
  • White matter disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

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