Metabolic and endocrine profiles in response to systemic infusion of fructose and glucose in rhesus macaques

Sean H. Adams, Kimber Stanhope, Ryan W. Grant, Bethany P. Cummings, Peter J Havel

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Abstract

Diurnal patterns of circulating leptin concentrations are attenuated after consumption of fructose-sweetened beverages compared with glucose-sweetened beverages, likely a result of limited postprandial glucose and insulin excursions after fructose. Differences in postprandial exposure of adipose tissue to peripheral circulating fructose and glucose or in adipocyte metabolism of the two sugars may also be involved. Thus, we compared plasma leptin concentrations after 6-h iv infusions of saline, glucose, or fructose (15 mg/kg·min) in overnight-fasted adult rhesus monkeys (n = 9). Despite increases of plasma fructose from undetectable levels to about 2 mM during fructose infusion, plasma leptin concentrations did not increase, and the change of insulin was only about 10% of that seen during glucose infusion. During glucose infusion, plasma leptin was significantly increased above baseline concentrations by 240 min and increased steadily until the final 480-min time point (change in leptin = +2.5 ± 0.9 ng/ml, P < 0.001 vs. saline; percent change in leptin = +55 ± 16%;P < 0.005 vs. saline). Substantial anaerobic metabolism of fructose was suggested by a large increase of steady-state plasma lactate (change in lactate = 1.64 ± 0.15 mM from baseline), which was significantly greater than that during glucose (+0.53 ± 0.14 mM) or saline (-0.51 ± 0.14 mM) infusions (P ± 0.001). Therefore, increased adipose exposure to fructose and an active whole-body anaerobic fructose metabolism are not sufficient to increase circulating leptin levels in rhesus monkeys. Thus, additional factors (i.e. limited post-fructose insulin excursions and/or hexose-specific differences in adipocyte metabolism) are likely to underlie disparate effects of fructose and glucose to increase circulating leptin concentrations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3002-3008
Number of pages7
JournalEndocrinology
Volume149
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008

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Metabolome
Fructose
Macaca mulatta
Leptin
Glucose
Anaerobiosis
Beverages
Insulin
Adipocytes
Lactic Acid
Hexoses
Adipose Tissue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Metabolic and endocrine profiles in response to systemic infusion of fructose and glucose in rhesus macaques. / Adams, Sean H.; Stanhope, Kimber; Grant, Ryan W.; Cummings, Bethany P.; Havel, Peter J.

In: Endocrinology, Vol. 149, No. 6, 06.2008, p. 3002-3008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Adams, Sean H. ; Stanhope, Kimber ; Grant, Ryan W. ; Cummings, Bethany P. ; Havel, Peter J. / Metabolic and endocrine profiles in response to systemic infusion of fructose and glucose in rhesus macaques. In: Endocrinology. 2008 ; Vol. 149, No. 6. pp. 3002-3008.
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