Metabolic and Endocrine Effects of a Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid-Rich Diet in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Siddika E Karakas, Rogelio U. Almario, Laura Gregory, Rodney Wong, Heather Todd, Bill L. Lasley

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Abstract

Effects of a polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-rich diet were investigated in 17 polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients. After a 3-month habitual diet period, dietary fats were partly replaced with PUFAs for another 3 months. The PUFA-rich diet increased plasma linoleic acid from 28.36 ± 1.00% to 33. 76 ± 1.08% (P < 0.002) and α-linolenic acid from 0.52 ± 0.03% to 1.06 ± 0.10% (P < 0.0001). Fasting glucose increased from 76 ± 3 to 95 ± 3 mg/dl (4.2 ± 0.2 to 5.30.2 mmol/liter; P < 0.0001), and the area under the curve for glucose during oral glucose tolerance test increased from 421 ± 34 to 503 ± 31 mg/dl (23.4 ± 1.9 to 27.9 ± 1.7 mmol/liter; P < 0.001). Plasma insulin did not change either at fasting or during oral glucose tolerance test. Fasting plasma free fatty acids decreased from 0.596 ± 0.048 to 0.446 ± 0.058 mg/dl (P = 0.037), and ketone bodies decreased from 9.14 ± 1.57 to 3.63 ± 0.62 mg/dl (895 ± 154 to 356 ± 61 μmol/liter; P < 0.003). Plasma 15-deoxyprostaglandin J2 tended to decrease (from 239 ± 65 to 171 ± 60 ng/ml; P = 0.053). Plasma testosterone, free testosterone, SHBG, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, LH, FSH, and urinary estrogen conjugates did not change. Urinary pregnanediol 3-glucuronide increased from 18.6 ± 2.2 to 31.0 ± 5.7 μg/mg creatinine (P = 0.038). In conclusion, increased dietary PUFA intake can exert significant metabolic and endocrine effects in women with PCOS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)615-620
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume89
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2004

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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