Meningococcal disease among children who live in a large metropolitan area, 1981-1996

V. J. Wang, Nathan Kuppermann, R. Malley, E. D. Barnett, H. C. Meissner, E. V. Schmidt, G. R. Fleisher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Neisseria meningitidis is an important cause of serious bacterial infections in children. We undertook a study to identify meningococcal infections of the blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or both of children in a defined geographic area to describe the burden of disease and the spectrum of illness. We reviewed the medical records of all children aged <18 years who had meningococcal infections at the 4 pediatric referral hospitals in Boston, Massachusetts, from 1981 through 1996. We identified 231 patients with meningococcal disease; of these 231 patients, 194 (84%) had overt disease and 37 (16%) had unsuspected disease. Clinical manifestations included meningitis in 150 patients, hypotension in 26, and purpura in 17. Sixteen patients (7%) died. Although meningococcal disease is devastating to a small number of children, we found that the burden of pediatric disease that it caused at the 4 pediatric referral centers in this geographic region was limited; that patients with overt meningococcal disease are most likely to have meningitis; and that individual practitioners are unlikely to encounter a patient with unsuspected meningococcal disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1004-1009
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume32
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2001

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Meningococcal Infections
Meningitis
Referral and Consultation
Pediatrics
Pediatric Hospitals
Purpura
Neisseria meningitidis
Bacterial Infections
Hypotension
Medical Records
Cerebrospinal Fluid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Wang, V. J., Kuppermann, N., Malley, R., Barnett, E. D., Meissner, H. C., Schmidt, E. V., & Fleisher, G. R. (2001). Meningococcal disease among children who live in a large metropolitan area, 1981-1996. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 32(7), 1004-1009. https://doi.org/10.1086/319595

Meningococcal disease among children who live in a large metropolitan area, 1981-1996. / Wang, V. J.; Kuppermann, Nathan; Malley, R.; Barnett, E. D.; Meissner, H. C.; Schmidt, E. V.; Fleisher, G. R.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 32, No. 7, 01.04.2001, p. 1004-1009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, VJ, Kuppermann, N, Malley, R, Barnett, ED, Meissner, HC, Schmidt, EV & Fleisher, GR 2001, 'Meningococcal disease among children who live in a large metropolitan area, 1981-1996', Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 32, no. 7, pp. 1004-1009. https://doi.org/10.1086/319595
Wang, V. J. ; Kuppermann, Nathan ; Malley, R. ; Barnett, E. D. ; Meissner, H. C. ; Schmidt, E. V. ; Fleisher, G. R. / Meningococcal disease among children who live in a large metropolitan area, 1981-1996. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2001 ; Vol. 32, No. 7. pp. 1004-1009.
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