Men with low vitamin A stores respond adequately to primary yellow fever and secondary tetanus toxoid vaccination

Shaikh M. Ahmad, Marjorie J. Haskell, Rubhana Raqib, Charles B. Stephensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current recommendations for vitamin A intake and liver stores (0.07 μmol/g) are based on maintaining normal vision. Higher levels may be required for maintaining normal immune function. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between total body vitamin A stores in adult men and measures of adaptive immune function. We conducted an 8-wk residential study among 36 healthy Bangladeshi men with low vitamin A stores. Subjects received a standard diet and were randomized in a double-blind fashion to receive vitamin A (240 mg) or placebo during wk 2 and 3. Subjects received Yellow Fever Virus (YFV) and tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccines during wk 5. Vitamin A stores were estimated by isotopic dilution during wk 8. Vaccine-specific lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine production, and serum antibody responses were evaluated before and after vaccination. Vitamin A supplementation increased YFV- and TT-specific lymphocyte proliferation and YFV-specific interleukin (IL)-5, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-a production but inhibited development of a TT-specific IL-10 response. Both groups developed protective antibody responses to both vaccines. Some responses correlated positively with vitamin A stores. These findings indicate that the currently recommended vitamin A intake is sufficient to sustain a protective response to YFV and TT vaccination. However, YFV-specific lymphocyte proliferation, some cytokine responses, and neutralizing antibody were positively associated with liver vitamin A stores <0.084 μmol/g. Such increases may enhance vaccine protection but raise the question of whether immune-mediated chronic diseases may by exacerbated by high-level dietary vitamin A.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2276-2283
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume138
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2008

Fingerprint

Yellow Fever
Tetanus Toxoid
Vitamin A
Vaccination
Yellow fever virus
Vaccines
Lymphocytes
Interleukin-10
Antibody Formation
Cytokines
Liver
Interleukin-5
Neutralizing Antibodies
Chronic Disease
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Placebos
Diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Men with low vitamin A stores respond adequately to primary yellow fever and secondary tetanus toxoid vaccination. / Ahmad, Shaikh M.; Haskell, Marjorie J.; Raqib, Rubhana; Stephensen, Charles B.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 138, No. 11, 11.2008, p. 2276-2283.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ahmad, Shaikh M. ; Haskell, Marjorie J. ; Raqib, Rubhana ; Stephensen, Charles B. / Men with low vitamin A stores respond adequately to primary yellow fever and secondary tetanus toxoid vaccination. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2008 ; Vol. 138, No. 11. pp. 2276-2283.
@article{dffd03f35a3147b49c09a3cd286c9881,
title = "Men with low vitamin A stores respond adequately to primary yellow fever and secondary tetanus toxoid vaccination",
abstract = "Current recommendations for vitamin A intake and liver stores (0.07 μmol/g) are based on maintaining normal vision. Higher levels may be required for maintaining normal immune function. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between total body vitamin A stores in adult men and measures of adaptive immune function. We conducted an 8-wk residential study among 36 healthy Bangladeshi men with low vitamin A stores. Subjects received a standard diet and were randomized in a double-blind fashion to receive vitamin A (240 mg) or placebo during wk 2 and 3. Subjects received Yellow Fever Virus (YFV) and tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccines during wk 5. Vitamin A stores were estimated by isotopic dilution during wk 8. Vaccine-specific lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine production, and serum antibody responses were evaluated before and after vaccination. Vitamin A supplementation increased YFV- and TT-specific lymphocyte proliferation and YFV-specific interleukin (IL)-5, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-a production but inhibited development of a TT-specific IL-10 response. Both groups developed protective antibody responses to both vaccines. Some responses correlated positively with vitamin A stores. These findings indicate that the currently recommended vitamin A intake is sufficient to sustain a protective response to YFV and TT vaccination. However, YFV-specific lymphocyte proliferation, some cytokine responses, and neutralizing antibody were positively associated with liver vitamin A stores <0.084 μmol/g. Such increases may enhance vaccine protection but raise the question of whether immune-mediated chronic diseases may by exacerbated by high-level dietary vitamin A.",
author = "Ahmad, {Shaikh M.} and Haskell, {Marjorie J.} and Rubhana Raqib and Stephensen, {Charles B.}",
year = "2008",
month = "11",
doi = "10.3945/jn.108.092056",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "138",
pages = "2276--2283",
journal = "Journal of Nutrition",
issn = "0022-3166",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Men with low vitamin A stores respond adequately to primary yellow fever and secondary tetanus toxoid vaccination

AU - Ahmad, Shaikh M.

AU - Haskell, Marjorie J.

AU - Raqib, Rubhana

AU - Stephensen, Charles B.

PY - 2008/11

Y1 - 2008/11

N2 - Current recommendations for vitamin A intake and liver stores (0.07 μmol/g) are based on maintaining normal vision. Higher levels may be required for maintaining normal immune function. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between total body vitamin A stores in adult men and measures of adaptive immune function. We conducted an 8-wk residential study among 36 healthy Bangladeshi men with low vitamin A stores. Subjects received a standard diet and were randomized in a double-blind fashion to receive vitamin A (240 mg) or placebo during wk 2 and 3. Subjects received Yellow Fever Virus (YFV) and tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccines during wk 5. Vitamin A stores were estimated by isotopic dilution during wk 8. Vaccine-specific lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine production, and serum antibody responses were evaluated before and after vaccination. Vitamin A supplementation increased YFV- and TT-specific lymphocyte proliferation and YFV-specific interleukin (IL)-5, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-a production but inhibited development of a TT-specific IL-10 response. Both groups developed protective antibody responses to both vaccines. Some responses correlated positively with vitamin A stores. These findings indicate that the currently recommended vitamin A intake is sufficient to sustain a protective response to YFV and TT vaccination. However, YFV-specific lymphocyte proliferation, some cytokine responses, and neutralizing antibody were positively associated with liver vitamin A stores <0.084 μmol/g. Such increases may enhance vaccine protection but raise the question of whether immune-mediated chronic diseases may by exacerbated by high-level dietary vitamin A.

AB - Current recommendations for vitamin A intake and liver stores (0.07 μmol/g) are based on maintaining normal vision. Higher levels may be required for maintaining normal immune function. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between total body vitamin A stores in adult men and measures of adaptive immune function. We conducted an 8-wk residential study among 36 healthy Bangladeshi men with low vitamin A stores. Subjects received a standard diet and were randomized in a double-blind fashion to receive vitamin A (240 mg) or placebo during wk 2 and 3. Subjects received Yellow Fever Virus (YFV) and tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccines during wk 5. Vitamin A stores were estimated by isotopic dilution during wk 8. Vaccine-specific lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine production, and serum antibody responses were evaluated before and after vaccination. Vitamin A supplementation increased YFV- and TT-specific lymphocyte proliferation and YFV-specific interleukin (IL)-5, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-a production but inhibited development of a TT-specific IL-10 response. Both groups developed protective antibody responses to both vaccines. Some responses correlated positively with vitamin A stores. These findings indicate that the currently recommended vitamin A intake is sufficient to sustain a protective response to YFV and TT vaccination. However, YFV-specific lymphocyte proliferation, some cytokine responses, and neutralizing antibody were positively associated with liver vitamin A stores <0.084 μmol/g. Such increases may enhance vaccine protection but raise the question of whether immune-mediated chronic diseases may by exacerbated by high-level dietary vitamin A.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=55949112520&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=55949112520&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3945/jn.108.092056

DO - 10.3945/jn.108.092056

M3 - Article

C2 - 18936231

AN - SCOPUS:55949112520

VL - 138

SP - 2276

EP - 2283

JO - Journal of Nutrition

JF - Journal of Nutrition

SN - 0022-3166

IS - 11

ER -