Melanoma and primary hepatocellular carcinoma

Christopher A. Aoki, Alan Geller, Moon S Chen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Melanoma and primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are two cancers with distinct disparity profiles. In the case of melanoma, while fair-skinned individuals with high education and income are more likely to be diagnosed, those of low socioeconomic status (SES) have a higher case-fatality rate. Greater awareness of warning signs of melanoma and access to primary care/dermatologists likely account for disparities between persons of moderate-high SES and those of lower SES. In the case of HCC, however, the highest incidence and mortality rates in the United States occur among Asian and Pacific Islanders (APIs); all other people of color have higher rates compared to non-Hispanic whites (Miller et al. 1996). Worldwide, APIs are approximately four times more frequently affected, and blacks and Hispanics approximately two times more frequently affected, than non-Hispanic whites. Even so, in the United States, the largest absolute number of HCC cases still occur among whites (El-Serag 2007).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationToward the Elimination of Cancer Disparities: Clinical and Public Health Perspectives
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages227-256
Number of pages30
ISBN (Print)9780387894423
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

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Social Class
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Melanoma
Education
Color
Mortality
Hispanic Americans
Primary Health Care
Incidence
Neoplasms
Dermatologists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Aoki, C. A., Geller, A., & Chen, M. S. (2009). Melanoma and primary hepatocellular carcinoma. In Toward the Elimination of Cancer Disparities: Clinical and Public Health Perspectives (pp. 227-256). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-89443-0_10

Melanoma and primary hepatocellular carcinoma. / Aoki, Christopher A.; Geller, Alan; Chen, Moon S.

Toward the Elimination of Cancer Disparities: Clinical and Public Health Perspectives. Springer New York, 2009. p. 227-256.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Aoki, CA, Geller, A & Chen, MS 2009, Melanoma and primary hepatocellular carcinoma. in Toward the Elimination of Cancer Disparities: Clinical and Public Health Perspectives. Springer New York, pp. 227-256. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-89443-0_10
Aoki CA, Geller A, Chen MS. Melanoma and primary hepatocellular carcinoma. In Toward the Elimination of Cancer Disparities: Clinical and Public Health Perspectives. Springer New York. 2009. p. 227-256 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-89443-0_10
Aoki, Christopher A. ; Geller, Alan ; Chen, Moon S. / Melanoma and primary hepatocellular carcinoma. Toward the Elimination of Cancer Disparities: Clinical and Public Health Perspectives. Springer New York, 2009. pp. 227-256
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