Meeting the Vitamin A Requirement: The Efficacy and Importance of β -Carotene in Animal Species

Alice S. Green, Andrea J Fascetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vitamin A is essential for life in all vertebrate animals. Vitamin A requirement can be met from dietary preformed vitamin A or provitamin A carotenoids, the most important of which is β-carotene. The metabolism of β-carotene, including its intestinal absorption, accumulation in tissues, and conversion to vitamin A, varies widely across animal species and determines the role that β-carotene plays in meeting vitamin A requirement. This review begins with a brief discussion of vitamin A, with an emphasis on species differences in metabolism. A more detailed discussion of β-carotene follows, with a focus on factors impacting bioavailability and its conversion to vitamin A. Finally, the literature on how animals utilize β-carotene is reviewed individually for several species and classes of animals. We conclude that β-carotene conversion to vitamin A is variable and dependent on a number of factors, which are important to consider in the formulation and assessment of diets. Omnivores and herbivores are more efficient at converting β-carotene to vitamin A than carnivores. Absorption and accumulation of β-carotene in tissues vary with species and are poorly understood. More comparative and mechanistic studies are required in this area to improve the understanding of β-carotene metabolism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number7393620
JournalThe Scientific World Journal
Volume2016
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

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Carotenoids
vitamin
Vitamin A
Animals
Metabolism
metabolism
animal
animal species
Tissue
Herbivory
carotenoid
carnivore
Intestinal Absorption
Nutrition
bioavailability
herbivore
Biological Availability
vertebrate
Vertebrates
diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Meeting the Vitamin A Requirement : The Efficacy and Importance of β -Carotene in Animal Species. / Green, Alice S.; Fascetti, Andrea J.

In: The Scientific World Journal, Vol. 2016, 7393620, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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