Medical student perceptions of self-paced, web-based electives: A descriptive study

Larissa S May, Kimberly D. Acquaviva, Annette Dorfman, Laurie Posey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A first-of-its-kind course at The George Washington University was taught entirely online using a self-paced, modular, case-based multispecialty format. Data on student perceptions of the course were obtained through a Web-based survey administered to students who had completed the course. Close-ended questions were analyzed using basic descriptive statistics in order to determine frequency of responses, whereas open-ended questions were analyzed thematically. Students reported having a favorable experience with the self-paced online course, with flexibility being the major benefit reported by respondents. Students in this asynchronous course perceived the two greatest challenges in online learning to be (1) decreased opportunity for social interaction and (2) technological barriers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)212-223
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Phytoremediation
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

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self-perception
descriptive studies
students
student
Students
online courses
learning
statistics
Statistics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Medical student perceptions of self-paced, web-based electives : A descriptive study. / May, Larissa S; Acquaviva, Kimberly D.; Dorfman, Annette; Posey, Laurie.

In: International Journal of Phytoremediation, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 212-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

May, Larissa S ; Acquaviva, Kimberly D. ; Dorfman, Annette ; Posey, Laurie. / Medical student perceptions of self-paced, web-based electives : A descriptive study. In: International Journal of Phytoremediation. 2009 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 212-223.
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