Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking Program: Reach to Pregnant and Parenting Women

Melanie S. Dove, Susan L Stewart, Sharon E. Cummins, Neal D. Kohatsu, Elisa Tong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: In California, half of pregnant women and children are on California's Medicaid (Medi-Cal). The Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking program provided incentives to adults on Medi-Cal to call the California Smokers Helpline (Helpline) from March 2012 to July 2015. This analysis examined reach of the Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking program among pregnant and parenting women. Methods: This study examined caller data from the Helpline from 2010 to 2015 among women of reproductive age (18–45 years) enrolled in Medi-Cal (n=32,691; analyzed in 2017/2018). The authors calculated the annual percentage of the target population reached who called the Helpline by pregnancy status and used adjusted prevalence ratios to examine the associations between Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking incentive period, pregnancy/parenting status, Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking incentives ($20 gift card and nicotine patch), and counseling. Results: Over the study period, the percentage of the target population reached increased for women of reproductive age (2.1% in 2011 to 3.0% in 2014) and pregnant women (2.1% in 2011 to 3.3% in 2014). The percentage of women who asked for the $20 gift card (13.6%) was not substantially different by pregnancy status, and WIC and nonprofits were important referral sources. Pregnant women were less likely to receive nicotine patches, but there was a 3- to 4-fold increase during the Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking incentive period for both pregnant and nonpregnant women. Among nonpregnant women, counseling decreased 14% during the Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking incentive period. Conclusions: Results suggest that the nicotine patch incentives motivated women to call the Helpline, even pregnant women who needed a physician's approval consistent with current American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists cautions about the appropriateness of the patch during pregnancy. Supplement information: This article is part of a supplement entitled Advancing Smoking Cessation in California's Medicaid Population, which is sponsored by the California Department of Public Health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S205-S213
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume55
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

Fingerprint

Parenting
Motivation
Pregnant Women
Smoking
Tobacco Use Cessation Products
Gift Giving
Pregnancy
Health Services Needs and Demand
Medicaid
Counseling
Smoking Cessation
Referral and Consultation
Public Health
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking Program : Reach to Pregnant and Parenting Women. / Dove, Melanie S.; Stewart, Susan L; Cummins, Sharon E.; Kohatsu, Neal D.; Tong, Elisa.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 55, No. 6, 01.12.2018, p. S205-S213.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dove, Melanie S. ; Stewart, Susan L ; Cummins, Sharon E. ; Kohatsu, Neal D. ; Tong, Elisa. / Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking Program : Reach to Pregnant and Parenting Women. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 55, No. 6. pp. S205-S213.
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abstract = "Introduction: In California, half of pregnant women and children are on California's Medicaid (Medi-Cal). The Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking program provided incentives to adults on Medi-Cal to call the California Smokers Helpline (Helpline) from March 2012 to July 2015. This analysis examined reach of the Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking program among pregnant and parenting women. Methods: This study examined caller data from the Helpline from 2010 to 2015 among women of reproductive age (18–45 years) enrolled in Medi-Cal (n=32,691; analyzed in 2017/2018). The authors calculated the annual percentage of the target population reached who called the Helpline by pregnancy status and used adjusted prevalence ratios to examine the associations between Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking incentive period, pregnancy/parenting status, Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking incentives ($20 gift card and nicotine patch), and counseling. Results: Over the study period, the percentage of the target population reached increased for women of reproductive age (2.1{\%} in 2011 to 3.0{\%} in 2014) and pregnant women (2.1{\%} in 2011 to 3.3{\%} in 2014). The percentage of women who asked for the $20 gift card (13.6{\%}) was not substantially different by pregnancy status, and WIC and nonprofits were important referral sources. Pregnant women were less likely to receive nicotine patches, but there was a 3- to 4-fold increase during the Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking incentive period for both pregnant and nonpregnant women. Among nonpregnant women, counseling decreased 14{\%} during the Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking incentive period. Conclusions: Results suggest that the nicotine patch incentives motivated women to call the Helpline, even pregnant women who needed a physician's approval consistent with current American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists cautions about the appropriateness of the patch during pregnancy. Supplement information: This article is part of a supplement entitled Advancing Smoking Cessation in California's Medicaid Population, which is sponsored by the California Department of Public Health.",
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AU - Cummins, Sharon E.

AU - Kohatsu, Neal D.

AU - Tong, Elisa

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N2 - Introduction: In California, half of pregnant women and children are on California's Medicaid (Medi-Cal). The Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking program provided incentives to adults on Medi-Cal to call the California Smokers Helpline (Helpline) from March 2012 to July 2015. This analysis examined reach of the Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking program among pregnant and parenting women. Methods: This study examined caller data from the Helpline from 2010 to 2015 among women of reproductive age (18–45 years) enrolled in Medi-Cal (n=32,691; analyzed in 2017/2018). The authors calculated the annual percentage of the target population reached who called the Helpline by pregnancy status and used adjusted prevalence ratios to examine the associations between Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking incentive period, pregnancy/parenting status, Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking incentives ($20 gift card and nicotine patch), and counseling. Results: Over the study period, the percentage of the target population reached increased for women of reproductive age (2.1% in 2011 to 3.0% in 2014) and pregnant women (2.1% in 2011 to 3.3% in 2014). The percentage of women who asked for the $20 gift card (13.6%) was not substantially different by pregnancy status, and WIC and nonprofits were important referral sources. Pregnant women were less likely to receive nicotine patches, but there was a 3- to 4-fold increase during the Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking incentive period for both pregnant and nonpregnant women. Among nonpregnant women, counseling decreased 14% during the Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking incentive period. Conclusions: Results suggest that the nicotine patch incentives motivated women to call the Helpline, even pregnant women who needed a physician's approval consistent with current American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists cautions about the appropriateness of the patch during pregnancy. Supplement information: This article is part of a supplement entitled Advancing Smoking Cessation in California's Medicaid Population, which is sponsored by the California Department of Public Health.

AB - Introduction: In California, half of pregnant women and children are on California's Medicaid (Medi-Cal). The Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking program provided incentives to adults on Medi-Cal to call the California Smokers Helpline (Helpline) from March 2012 to July 2015. This analysis examined reach of the Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking program among pregnant and parenting women. Methods: This study examined caller data from the Helpline from 2010 to 2015 among women of reproductive age (18–45 years) enrolled in Medi-Cal (n=32,691; analyzed in 2017/2018). The authors calculated the annual percentage of the target population reached who called the Helpline by pregnancy status and used adjusted prevalence ratios to examine the associations between Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking incentive period, pregnancy/parenting status, Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking incentives ($20 gift card and nicotine patch), and counseling. Results: Over the study period, the percentage of the target population reached increased for women of reproductive age (2.1% in 2011 to 3.0% in 2014) and pregnant women (2.1% in 2011 to 3.3% in 2014). The percentage of women who asked for the $20 gift card (13.6%) was not substantially different by pregnancy status, and WIC and nonprofits were important referral sources. Pregnant women were less likely to receive nicotine patches, but there was a 3- to 4-fold increase during the Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking incentive period for both pregnant and nonpregnant women. Among nonpregnant women, counseling decreased 14% during the Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking incentive period. Conclusions: Results suggest that the nicotine patch incentives motivated women to call the Helpline, even pregnant women who needed a physician's approval consistent with current American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists cautions about the appropriateness of the patch during pregnancy. Supplement information: This article is part of a supplement entitled Advancing Smoking Cessation in California's Medicaid Population, which is sponsored by the California Department of Public Health.

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