Mechanisms underlying comprehension of health information in adulthood: The roles of prior knowledge and working memory capacity

Lisa M. Soederberg Miller, Tanja N. Gibson, Elizabeth A. Applegate, Jeannette De Dios

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prior knowledge, working memory capacity (WMC), and conceptual integration (attention allocated to integrating concepts in text) are critical within many contexts; however, their impact on the acquisition of health information (i.e. learning) is relatively unexplored.We examined how these factors impact learning about nutrition within a cross-sectional study of adults ages 18 to 81. Results showed that conceptual integration mediated the effects of knowledge and WMC on learning, confirming that attention to concepts while reading is important for learning about health. We also found that when knowledge was controlled, age declines in learning increased, suggesting that knowledge mitigates the effects of age on learning about nutrition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)794-806
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011

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Short-Term Memory
Learning
Health
Reading
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • aging
  • health education
  • health information processing
  • knowledge
  • nutrition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Mechanisms underlying comprehension of health information in adulthood : The roles of prior knowledge and working memory capacity. / Soederberg Miller, Lisa M.; Gibson, Tanja N.; Applegate, Elizabeth A.; De Dios, Jeannette.

In: Journal of Health Psychology, Vol. 16, No. 5, 01.07.2011, p. 794-806.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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