Mechanisms by which dietary sugars influence lipid metabolism, circulating lipids and lipoproteins, and cardiovascular risk

Kimber Stanhope, Peter J Havel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

There is considerable epidemiological evidence suggesting intake of added sugars and/or sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with the presence of unfavorable lipid/lipoprotein levels [1-3], insulin resistance [4,5], fatty liver [6,7], type 2 diabetes [8-12], cardiovascular disease [13,14], metabolic syndrome [15-18], and increased visceral adiposity [19,20]. However, these studies do not provide definitive evidence that consumption of excessive sugars leads to the development of these adverse metabolic states. For that, direct experimental evidence demonstrating that consumption of diets high in sugars alters risk factors for metabolic disease compared with isocaloric diets that are low in sugar is needed. It is also necessary to demonstrate that there are plausible mechanisms to mediate a causal relationship between sugar and metabolic disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDietary Sugars and Health
PublisherCRC Press
Pages265-280
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781466593787
ISBN (Print)9781466593770
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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