Mechanical comparison of 3.5 mm broad dynamic compression plate, broad limited-contact dynamic compression plate, and narrow locking compression plate systems using interfragmentary gap models

Justin M. Uhl, Bernard Seguin, Amy Kapatkin, Kurt S. Schulz, Tanya C. Garcia, Susan M Stover

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives To compare (1) pullout properties between 3.5 mm cortical and locking screws, and (2) mechanical properties and gap displacements between the 3.5 mm broad limited-contact dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP), broad dynamic compression plate (DCP), and narrow locking compression plate (LCP), during axial loading of plate-stabilized diaphyseal fragments with an interfragmentary gap. Study Design In vitro mechanical testing of implanted polyurethane foam (PUF) hollow cylinders that simulated compact or osteopenic diaphyseal bone. Sample Population (1) Five cortical and locking screws and (2) 4 PUF-plate constructs for each plate type; using high- and low-density (0.8 and 0.32 g/cm3) cylinders. Methods (1) Screws were completely extracted at 5 mm/min. (2) Plated constructs were axially compressed at 300 N/s for 10 cycles from 5 to 355 N to determine gap displacement during physiologic loading, followed by single cycle increasing load to failure. Results Pullout properties were not different between screw types. All plate constructs had yield loads over 3 times trotting loads. Gap closure occurred with LC-DCP and DCP constructs, but not LCP constructs. LCP construct properties were most similar to LC-DCP and DCP construct properties in the low-density model. Conclusion All plate systems sustained physiologic limb loads. Only LCP constructs maintained some gap integrity, although LC-DCP and DCP screws were placed in neutral position. Clinical Relevance The LCP system is more likely than LC-DCP and DCP systems, with neutrally positioned screws, to maintain a planned interfragmentary gap, although gap strains range from 0% to 15% across the 2 mm gap during a trot load.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)663-673
Number of pages11
JournalVeterinary Surgery
Volume37
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008

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screws
Weight-Bearing
Extremities
Bone and Bones
polyurethanes
Population
foams
polyurethane foam
trotting
limbs (animal)
mechanical properties
experimental design
bones
In Vitro Techniques
testing
sampling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Mechanical comparison of 3.5 mm broad dynamic compression plate, broad limited-contact dynamic compression plate, and narrow locking compression plate systems using interfragmentary gap models. / Uhl, Justin M.; Seguin, Bernard; Kapatkin, Amy; Schulz, Kurt S.; Garcia, Tanya C.; Stover, Susan M.

In: Veterinary Surgery, Vol. 37, No. 7, 10.2008, p. 663-673.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Mechanical comparison of 3.5 mm broad dynamic compression plate, broad limited-contact dynamic compression plate, and narrow locking compression plate systems using interfragmentary gap models",
abstract = "Objectives To compare (1) pullout properties between 3.5 mm cortical and locking screws, and (2) mechanical properties and gap displacements between the 3.5 mm broad limited-contact dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP), broad dynamic compression plate (DCP), and narrow locking compression plate (LCP), during axial loading of plate-stabilized diaphyseal fragments with an interfragmentary gap. Study Design In vitro mechanical testing of implanted polyurethane foam (PUF) hollow cylinders that simulated compact or osteopenic diaphyseal bone. Sample Population (1) Five cortical and locking screws and (2) 4 PUF-plate constructs for each plate type; using high- and low-density (0.8 and 0.32 g/cm3) cylinders. Methods (1) Screws were completely extracted at 5 mm/min. (2) Plated constructs were axially compressed at 300 N/s for 10 cycles from 5 to 355 N to determine gap displacement during physiologic loading, followed by single cycle increasing load to failure. Results Pullout properties were not different between screw types. All plate constructs had yield loads over 3 times trotting loads. Gap closure occurred with LC-DCP and DCP constructs, but not LCP constructs. LCP construct properties were most similar to LC-DCP and DCP construct properties in the low-density model. Conclusion All plate systems sustained physiologic limb loads. Only LCP constructs maintained some gap integrity, although LC-DCP and DCP screws were placed in neutral position. Clinical Relevance The LCP system is more likely than LC-DCP and DCP systems, with neutrally positioned screws, to maintain a planned interfragmentary gap, although gap strains range from 0{\%} to 15{\%} across the 2 mm gap during a trot load.",
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AU - Kapatkin, Amy

AU - Schulz, Kurt S.

AU - Garcia, Tanya C.

AU - Stover, Susan M

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N2 - Objectives To compare (1) pullout properties between 3.5 mm cortical and locking screws, and (2) mechanical properties and gap displacements between the 3.5 mm broad limited-contact dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP), broad dynamic compression plate (DCP), and narrow locking compression plate (LCP), during axial loading of plate-stabilized diaphyseal fragments with an interfragmentary gap. Study Design In vitro mechanical testing of implanted polyurethane foam (PUF) hollow cylinders that simulated compact or osteopenic diaphyseal bone. Sample Population (1) Five cortical and locking screws and (2) 4 PUF-plate constructs for each plate type; using high- and low-density (0.8 and 0.32 g/cm3) cylinders. Methods (1) Screws were completely extracted at 5 mm/min. (2) Plated constructs were axially compressed at 300 N/s for 10 cycles from 5 to 355 N to determine gap displacement during physiologic loading, followed by single cycle increasing load to failure. Results Pullout properties were not different between screw types. All plate constructs had yield loads over 3 times trotting loads. Gap closure occurred with LC-DCP and DCP constructs, but not LCP constructs. LCP construct properties were most similar to LC-DCP and DCP construct properties in the low-density model. Conclusion All plate systems sustained physiologic limb loads. Only LCP constructs maintained some gap integrity, although LC-DCP and DCP screws were placed in neutral position. Clinical Relevance The LCP system is more likely than LC-DCP and DCP systems, with neutrally positioned screws, to maintain a planned interfragmentary gap, although gap strains range from 0% to 15% across the 2 mm gap during a trot load.

AB - Objectives To compare (1) pullout properties between 3.5 mm cortical and locking screws, and (2) mechanical properties and gap displacements between the 3.5 mm broad limited-contact dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP), broad dynamic compression plate (DCP), and narrow locking compression plate (LCP), during axial loading of plate-stabilized diaphyseal fragments with an interfragmentary gap. Study Design In vitro mechanical testing of implanted polyurethane foam (PUF) hollow cylinders that simulated compact or osteopenic diaphyseal bone. Sample Population (1) Five cortical and locking screws and (2) 4 PUF-plate constructs for each plate type; using high- and low-density (0.8 and 0.32 g/cm3) cylinders. Methods (1) Screws were completely extracted at 5 mm/min. (2) Plated constructs were axially compressed at 300 N/s for 10 cycles from 5 to 355 N to determine gap displacement during physiologic loading, followed by single cycle increasing load to failure. Results Pullout properties were not different between screw types. All plate constructs had yield loads over 3 times trotting loads. Gap closure occurred with LC-DCP and DCP constructs, but not LCP constructs. LCP construct properties were most similar to LC-DCP and DCP construct properties in the low-density model. Conclusion All plate systems sustained physiologic limb loads. Only LCP constructs maintained some gap integrity, although LC-DCP and DCP screws were placed in neutral position. Clinical Relevance The LCP system is more likely than LC-DCP and DCP systems, with neutrally positioned screws, to maintain a planned interfragmentary gap, although gap strains range from 0% to 15% across the 2 mm gap during a trot load.

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