Meat consumption and its associations with other diet and health factors in young adults: The CARDIA study

Martha L. Slattery, David R. Jacobs, Joan E. Hilner, Bette J. Caan, Linda Van Horn, Charlotte Bragg, Ten A. Manolio, Lawrence H. Kushi, Kiang Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using cross-sectional data from the longitudinal Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study, we assessed associations between meat consumption and other dietary- and health-status indicators. Less than one percent of this sample (n = 32) ate no red meat or poultry, and another 1% (n = 47) ate red meat or poultry less than once per week. Individuals who ate red meat and poultry less than once per week were less likely to drink alcohol (P = 0.003); reported more physical activity (P ≤, 0.001); had higher Keys scores (P ≤ 0.001); consumed diets higher in carbohydrates, starch, fiber, vitamins A and C, and calcium and lower in energy, fat, and protein (P ≤ 0.001); had smaller body sizes as indicated by the body mass index [calculated as wt(kg)/ht(m2)] (P = 0.01); and had lower concentrations of total serum cholesterol (P = 0.001), low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (P = 0.001), and triglycerides (P = 0.015) compared with individuals who consumed meat more frequently.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)930-935
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume54
Issue number5
StatePublished - Nov 1991
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Body size
  • Cholesterol
  • Dietary intake
  • Lipids
  • Meat
  • Physical activity
  • Vegetarians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

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