Measuring episodic memory across the lifespan: NIH toolbox picture sequence memory test

Sureyya S. Dikmen, Patricia J. Bauer, Sandra Weintraub, Dan M Mungas, Jerry Slotkin, Jennifer L. Beaumont, Richard Gershon, Nancy R. Temkin, Robert K. Heaton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

43 Scopus citations

Abstract

Episodic memory is one of the most important cognitive domains that involves acquiring, storing and recalling new information. In this article, we describe a new measure developed for the NIH Toolbox, called the Picture Sequence Memory Test (PSMT) that is the first to examine episodic memory across the age range from 3 to 85. We describe the development of the measure and present validation data for ages 20 to 85. The PSMT involves presentation of sequences of pictured objects and activities in a fixed order on a computer screen and simultaneously verbally described, that the participant must remember and then reproduce over three learning trials. The results indicate good test-retest reliability and construct validity. Performance is strongly related to well-established gold standard measures of episodic memory and, as expected, much less well correlated with those of a measure of vocabulary. It shows clear decline with aging in parallel with a gold standard summary measure and relates to several other demographic factors and to self-reported general health status. The PSMT appears to be a reliable and valid test of episodic memory for adults, a finding similar to those found for the same measure with children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)611-619
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Key words Episodic memory
  • Learning
  • NIH toolbox
  • Test development
  • Validation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

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