Measurement of humeroradial and humeroulnar transarticular joint forces in the canine elbow joint after humeral wedge and humeral slide osteotomies

David R. Mason, Kurt S. Schulz, Yukihiro Fujita, Philip H Kass, Susan M Stover

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine the effect of humeral wedge and humeral slide osteotomies on force distribution between the articular surfaces of the humerus and the radius and ulna in normal canine thoracic limbs. In vitro mechanical testing. Cadaveric canine right thoracic limbs (n=12). Transarticular elbow force maps were measured using a tactile array pressure sensor in elbow joints of axially aligned limbs under 200 N axial load before and after humeral wedge and humeral slide osteotomies. Loading induced 2 distinct areas of high forces that corresponded with the proximal articular surfaces of the radius and ulna. Mean force on the proximal articular surface of the ulna was reduced by 25% and 28% after 4 and 8 mm sliding osteotomies, respectively. Statistically significant differences were not observed for the wedge osteotomies. Humeral slide osteotomy significantly decreases force on the proximal articular surface of the ulna. The proximal articular surface of the ulna contributes significantly to load transfer through the canine elbow joint. Abnormalities that significantly increase this force might contribute to canine elbow dysplasia, specifically fragmentation of the medial coronoid process and osteochondritis dissecans of the medial aspect of the humeral condyle. Under the conditions studied, the overall reduction in mean joint surface force across the proximal articular surface of the ulna after humeral slide osteotomy indicates that this technique merits further investigation for potential use in medial compartmental osteoarthritis of the canine elbow joint.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-70
Number of pages8
JournalVeterinary Surgery
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2008

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Elbow Joint
elbows
Ulna
ulna
Osteotomy
joints (animal)
Canidae
Joints
dogs
limbs (animal)
radius (bone)
Extremities
chest
Elbow
Thorax
osteochondritis dissecans
Osteochondritis Dissecans
humerus
osteoarthritis
Humerus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Measurement of humeroradial and humeroulnar transarticular joint forces in the canine elbow joint after humeral wedge and humeral slide osteotomies. / Mason, David R.; Schulz, Kurt S.; Fujita, Yukihiro; Kass, Philip H; Stover, Susan M.

In: Veterinary Surgery, Vol. 37, No. 1, 01.2008, p. 63-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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