Measurement error in dietary data: Implications for the epidemiologic study of the diet-disease relationship

S. Paeratakul, B. M. Popkin, L. Kohlmeier, Irva Hertz-Picciotto, X. Guo, L. J. Edwards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the effect of measurement error in dietary data on the relationship between diet and body mass index (BMI). To correct for the effect of measurement error on diet-BMI association by using replicate measurements of diet. The effect of measurement error on diet-BMI relationship was simulated, and its implications are discussed. Design: Prospective study design. Setting: The first and second China Health and Nutrition Survey conducted in 1989 and 1991, respectively. Subjects: Three thousand, four hundred and seventy-nine adults age 20-45 y at the 1989 survey. Methods: Statistical methods were used to demonstrate the effect of measurement error in dietary data on the diet-BMI association. Results: By using the average of three replicate 24 h dietary recalls, the attenuation of diet-BMI association was reduced substantially. The regression coefficients of fat and energy intakes differed markedly from those computed by using only single measurement of diet. Conclusions: Measurement error in dietary data may significantly attenuate the diet-disease association. Where appropriate, specific emphasis may be needed to address the problem of measurement error in the study of diet-disease relationship. Spnosorship: This research was supported by the National Institute of Health, the Carolina Population Center and the Nutrition Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)722-727
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume52
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

epidemiological studies
Epidemiologic Studies
Diet
body mass index
diet
Body Mass Index
National Institutes of Health
diet-related diseases
diet recall
diet study techniques
fat intake
Nutrition Surveys
prospective studies
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Energy Intake
Health Surveys
energy intake
statistical analysis
experimental design
China

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Diet
  • Errors-in-variables
  • Measurement error
  • Within-person error

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Measurement error in dietary data : Implications for the epidemiologic study of the diet-disease relationship. / Paeratakul, S.; Popkin, B. M.; Kohlmeier, L.; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Guo, X.; Edwards, L. J.

In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 52, No. 10, 1998, p. 722-727.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Paeratakul, S. ; Popkin, B. M. ; Kohlmeier, L. ; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva ; Guo, X. ; Edwards, L. J. / Measurement error in dietary data : Implications for the epidemiologic study of the diet-disease relationship. In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1998 ; Vol. 52, No. 10. pp. 722-727.
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