Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization of Size- and Composition-Selected Aerosol Particles

Bashir A. Mansoori, Murray V. Johnston, Anthony S. Wexler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was performed on individual, size-selected aerosol particles in the 2-8 μm diameter range. Monodisperse aerosol droplets containing matrix, analyte, and solvent were generated and entrained in a dry stream of air. The dried particles were drawn from atmospheric pressure directly into the source region of a reflecting field time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Individual particles were then detected by light scattering and analyzed on-the-fly by MALDI. The particle size and composition were systematically varied, and both liquid and solid matrices were studied. As the analyte-to-matrix mole ratio increased, the analyte signal intensity first increased and men leveled off. Quenching effects were observed when two different peptides were present in the same particle. These dependences were interpreted on the basis of analyte surface activity and adsorption isotherms. With a liquid matrix, the analyte is thought to partition between the particle surface and bulk. The signal intensity increases with analyte surface coverage until a monolayer is formed. With a solid matrix, the analyte is thought to adsorb on the surface of the original droplet containing matrix, analyte, and solvent When the solvent evaporates, the analyte deposits on the dry particle surface. Again, the signal intensity increases with analyte surface coverage until a monolayer is formed. With either a solid or liquid matrix, signal quenching is observed when multiple analytes compete for surface adsorption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3595-3601
Number of pages7
JournalAnalytical Chemistry
Volume68
Issue number20
StatePublished - Oct 15 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Aerosols
Ionization
Desorption
Lasers
Chemical analysis
Quenching
Monolayers
Liquids
Mass spectrometers
Adsorption isotherms
Light scattering
Atmospheric pressure
Deposits
Particle size
Adsorption
Peptides
Air

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry

Cite this

Mansoori, B. A., Johnston, M. V., & Wexler, A. S. (1996). Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization of Size- and Composition-Selected Aerosol Particles. Analytical Chemistry, 68(20), 3595-3601.

Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization of Size- and Composition-Selected Aerosol Particles. / Mansoori, Bashir A.; Johnston, Murray V.; Wexler, Anthony S.

In: Analytical Chemistry, Vol. 68, No. 20, 15.10.1996, p. 3595-3601.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mansoori, BA, Johnston, MV & Wexler, AS 1996, 'Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization of Size- and Composition-Selected Aerosol Particles', Analytical Chemistry, vol. 68, no. 20, pp. 3595-3601.
Mansoori, Bashir A. ; Johnston, Murray V. ; Wexler, Anthony S. / Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization of Size- and Composition-Selected Aerosol Particles. In: Analytical Chemistry. 1996 ; Vol. 68, No. 20. pp. 3595-3601.
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