Maternal stress and preterm birth

Nancy Dole, D. A. Savitz, Irva Hertz-Picciotto, A. M. Siega-Riz, M. J. McMahon, P. Buekens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

506 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined a comprehensive array of psychosocial factors, including life events, social support, depression, pregnancy-related anxiety, perceived discrimination, and neighborhood safety in relation to preterm birth (<37 weeks) in a prospective cohort study of 1,962 pregnant women in central North Carolina between 1996 and 2000, in which 12% delivered preterm. There was an increased risk of preterm birth among women with high counts of pregnancy-related anxiety (risk ratio (RR) = 2.1, 95% confidence interval (Cl): 1.5, 3.0), with life events to which the respondent assigned a negative impact weight (RR = 1.8, 95% Cl: 1.2, 2.7), and with a perception of racial discrimination (RR = 1.4, 95% Cl: 1.0, 2.0). Different levels of social support or depression were not associated with preterm birth. Preterm birth initiated by labor or ruptured membranes was associated with pregnancy-related anxiety among women assigning a high level of negative impact weights (RR = 3.0, 95% Cl: 1.7, 5.3). The association between high levels of pregnancy-related anxiety and preterm birth was reduced when restricted to women without medical comorbidities, but the association was not eliminated. The prospective collection of multiple psychosocial measures on a large population of women indicates that a subset of these factors is associated with preterm birth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14-24
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume157
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Premature Birth
Mothers
Anxiety
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Social Support
Depression
Weights and Measures
Racism
Comorbidity
Pregnant Women
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Confidence Intervals
Psychology
Safety
Membranes
Population

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Discrimination (psychology)
  • Infant, premature
  • Pregnancy
  • Social support
  • Stress, psychological

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Dole, N., Savitz, D. A., Hertz-Picciotto, I., Siega-Riz, A. M., McMahon, M. J., & Buekens, P. (2003). Maternal stress and preterm birth. American Journal of Epidemiology, 157(1), 14-24. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwf176

Maternal stress and preterm birth. / Dole, Nancy; Savitz, D. A.; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Siega-Riz, A. M.; McMahon, M. J.; Buekens, P.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 157, No. 1, 01.01.2003, p. 14-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dole, N, Savitz, DA, Hertz-Picciotto, I, Siega-Riz, AM, McMahon, MJ & Buekens, P 2003, 'Maternal stress and preterm birth', American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 157, no. 1, pp. 14-24. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwf176
Dole N, Savitz DA, Hertz-Picciotto I, Siega-Riz AM, McMahon MJ, Buekens P. Maternal stress and preterm birth. American Journal of Epidemiology. 2003 Jan 1;157(1):14-24. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwf176
Dole, Nancy ; Savitz, D. A. ; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva ; Siega-Riz, A. M. ; McMahon, M. J. ; Buekens, P. / Maternal stress and preterm birth. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 2003 ; Vol. 157, No. 1. pp. 14-24.
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