Maternal Anti-Fetal Brain IgG Autoantibodies and Autism Spectrum Disorder

Current Knowledge and its Implications for Potential Therapeutics

Elizabeth Fox-Edmiston, Judith A Van de Water

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several studies have found a correlation between the presence of circulating maternal autoantibodies and neuronal dysfunction in the neonate. Specifically, maternal anti-brain autoantibodies, which may access the fetal compartment during gestation, have been identified as one risk factor for developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Studies by our laboratory elucidated seven neurodevelopmental proteins recognized by maternal autoantibodies whose presence is associated with a diagnosis of maternal autoantibody-related (MAR) autism in the child. While the specific process of anti-brain autoantibody generation is unclear and the detailed pathogenic mechanisms are currently unknown, identification of the maternal autoantibody targets increases the therapeutic possibilities. The potential therapies discussed in this review provide a framework for possible future medical interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)715-724
Number of pages10
JournalCNS Drugs
Volume29
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

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Autoantibodies
Immunoglobulin G
Mothers
Brain
Therapeutics
Autistic Disorder
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Newborn Infant
Pregnancy
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Maternal Anti-Fetal Brain IgG Autoantibodies and Autism Spectrum Disorder : Current Knowledge and its Implications for Potential Therapeutics. / Fox-Edmiston, Elizabeth; Van de Water, Judith A.

In: CNS Drugs, Vol. 29, No. 9, 01.09.2015, p. 715-724.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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