Matchmaking the B-cell signature of tolerance to regulatory B cells

A. S. Chong, Roger Sciammas

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Confirmation of clinical tolerance requires the cessation of immunosuppressive drugs, which evoke immune reactivation and allograft rejection in all but the rare individuals who successfully transition into a state of operational transplantation tolerance. Therefore, the safe conduct of trials in transplantation tolerance requires two conditions: a sensitive and reliable means to identify individuals still being maintained on immunosuppression who are most likely to exhibit tolerance after immunosuppression is withdrawn and a noninvasive means that assesses the quality or robustness of the tolerant (TOL) state. Two recent studies attempting to identify a gene signature in peripheral blood of spontaneously TOL kidney transplant recipients made the unexpected observation that TOL, but not immune-suppressed transplant recipients, exhibited enriched B cells and B-cell transcripts in their blood. In concert with the emerging appreciation of a specialized subset of regulatory B cells (Bregs) that possess immune-modulatory function, these observations raise the possibility that Bregs play a critical role in the maintenance of tolerance to renal allografts in transplant patients. This review summarizes these recent findings and speculates on the relationship of Bregs to the maintenance of transplantation tolerance. The authors discuss recent findings of enriched B cells and B cell transcripts in the blood of tolerant kidney transplant patients and speculate on the relationship of regulatory B cells to the maintenance of transplantation tolerance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2555-2560
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume11
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Regulatory B-Lymphocytes
Transplantation Tolerance
B-Lymphocytes
Maintenance
Kidney
Immunosuppression
Allografts
Transplants
Immunosuppressive Agents
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Genes

Keywords

  • Biomarkers
  • regulatory B cells
  • transplantation tolerance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Matchmaking the B-cell signature of tolerance to regulatory B cells. / Chong, A. S.; Sciammas, Roger.

In: American Journal of Transplantation, Vol. 11, No. 12, 12.2011, p. 2555-2560.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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