Marital status and the progression of functional disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

Michael M. Ward, J Paul Leigh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To determine if marital status is associated with differences in rates of progression of functional disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. A community cohort of 282 persons with RA was followed prospectively for up to 9.5 years. The progression of functional disability over time was determined using the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index, which was completed by study participants every 6 months. Results. At study entry, the Disability Index was 1.1 ± 0.8 (mean ± 1 SD) (possible range 0-3) among the 188 married participants and 1.3 ± 0.9 among the 94 unmarried participants. Over time, the rate of progression of functional disability was generally higher among unmarried participants. However, the extent of this difference varied somewhat over the disease course, with rates of progression higher among unmarried than among married participants during years 5-7 and years 17-29 of RA. Overall estimated rates of progression, adjusted for the effects of other sociodemographic factors, were 0.03 Disability Index units per year in unmarried participants and 0.01 Disability Index units per year in married participants (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. Marriage, possibly reflecting the influence of social support, is associated with a lower rate of progression of functional disability in persons with RA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)581-588
Number of pages8
JournalArthritis and Rheumatism
Volume36
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Marital Status
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Disabled Persons
Marriage
Social Support
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Marital status and the progression of functional disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. / Ward, Michael M.; Leigh, J Paul.

In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, Vol. 36, No. 5, 05.1993, p. 581-588.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{05975210d4f645b1ae9b3dcf4df7ab55,
title = "Marital status and the progression of functional disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritis",
abstract = "Objective. To determine if marital status is associated with differences in rates of progression of functional disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. A community cohort of 282 persons with RA was followed prospectively for up to 9.5 years. The progression of functional disability over time was determined using the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index, which was completed by study participants every 6 months. Results. At study entry, the Disability Index was 1.1 ± 0.8 (mean ± 1 SD) (possible range 0-3) among the 188 married participants and 1.3 ± 0.9 among the 94 unmarried participants. Over time, the rate of progression of functional disability was generally higher among unmarried participants. However, the extent of this difference varied somewhat over the disease course, with rates of progression higher among unmarried than among married participants during years 5-7 and years 17-29 of RA. Overall estimated rates of progression, adjusted for the effects of other sociodemographic factors, were 0.03 Disability Index units per year in unmarried participants and 0.01 Disability Index units per year in married participants (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. Marriage, possibly reflecting the influence of social support, is associated with a lower rate of progression of functional disability in persons with RA.",
author = "Ward, {Michael M.} and Leigh, {J Paul}",
year = "1993",
month = "5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "36",
pages = "581--588",
journal = "Arthritis and Rheumatology",
issn = "2326-5191",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Marital status and the progression of functional disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

AU - Ward, Michael M.

AU - Leigh, J Paul

PY - 1993/5

Y1 - 1993/5

N2 - Objective. To determine if marital status is associated with differences in rates of progression of functional disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. A community cohort of 282 persons with RA was followed prospectively for up to 9.5 years. The progression of functional disability over time was determined using the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index, which was completed by study participants every 6 months. Results. At study entry, the Disability Index was 1.1 ± 0.8 (mean ± 1 SD) (possible range 0-3) among the 188 married participants and 1.3 ± 0.9 among the 94 unmarried participants. Over time, the rate of progression of functional disability was generally higher among unmarried participants. However, the extent of this difference varied somewhat over the disease course, with rates of progression higher among unmarried than among married participants during years 5-7 and years 17-29 of RA. Overall estimated rates of progression, adjusted for the effects of other sociodemographic factors, were 0.03 Disability Index units per year in unmarried participants and 0.01 Disability Index units per year in married participants (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. Marriage, possibly reflecting the influence of social support, is associated with a lower rate of progression of functional disability in persons with RA.

AB - Objective. To determine if marital status is associated with differences in rates of progression of functional disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. A community cohort of 282 persons with RA was followed prospectively for up to 9.5 years. The progression of functional disability over time was determined using the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index, which was completed by study participants every 6 months. Results. At study entry, the Disability Index was 1.1 ± 0.8 (mean ± 1 SD) (possible range 0-3) among the 188 married participants and 1.3 ± 0.9 among the 94 unmarried participants. Over time, the rate of progression of functional disability was generally higher among unmarried participants. However, the extent of this difference varied somewhat over the disease course, with rates of progression higher among unmarried than among married participants during years 5-7 and years 17-29 of RA. Overall estimated rates of progression, adjusted for the effects of other sociodemographic factors, were 0.03 Disability Index units per year in unmarried participants and 0.01 Disability Index units per year in married participants (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. Marriage, possibly reflecting the influence of social support, is associated with a lower rate of progression of functional disability in persons with RA.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027159721&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027159721&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 36

SP - 581

EP - 588

JO - Arthritis and Rheumatology

JF - Arthritis and Rheumatology

SN - 2326-5191

IS - 5

ER -