Mapping early brain development in autism.

Eric Courchesne, Karen Pierce, Cynthia Schumann, Elizabeth Redcay, Joseph A. Buckwalter, Daniel P. Kennedy, John Morgan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

458 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although the neurobiology of autism has been studied for more than two decades, the majority of these studies have examined brain structure 10, 20, or more years after the onset of clinical symptoms. The pathological biology that causes autism remains unknown, but its signature is likely to be most evident during the first years of life when clinical symptoms are emerging. This review highlights neurobiological findings during the first years of life and emphasizes early brain overgrowth as a key factor in the pathobiology of autism. We speculate that excess neuron numbers may be one possible cause of early brain overgrowth and produce defects in neural patterning and wiring, with exuberant local and short-distance cortical interactions impeding the function of large-scale, long-distance interactions between brain regions. Because large-scale networks underlie socio-emotional and communication functions, such alterations in brain architecture could relate to the early clinical manifestations of autism. As such, autism may additionally provide unique insight into genetic and developmental processes that shape early neural wiring patterns and make possible higher-order social, emotional, and communication functions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-413
Number of pages15
JournalNeuron
Volume56
Issue number2
StatePublished - Oct 25 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Brain Mapping
Autistic Disorder
Brain
Communication
Genetic Phenomena
Neurobiology
Neurons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Courchesne, E., Pierce, K., Schumann, C., Redcay, E., Buckwalter, J. A., Kennedy, D. P., & Morgan, J. (2007). Mapping early brain development in autism. Neuron, 56(2), 399-413.

Mapping early brain development in autism. / Courchesne, Eric; Pierce, Karen; Schumann, Cynthia; Redcay, Elizabeth; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Kennedy, Daniel P.; Morgan, John.

In: Neuron, Vol. 56, No. 2, 25.10.2007, p. 399-413.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Courchesne, E, Pierce, K, Schumann, C, Redcay, E, Buckwalter, JA, Kennedy, DP & Morgan, J 2007, 'Mapping early brain development in autism.', Neuron, vol. 56, no. 2, pp. 399-413.
Courchesne E, Pierce K, Schumann C, Redcay E, Buckwalter JA, Kennedy DP et al. Mapping early brain development in autism. Neuron. 2007 Oct 25;56(2):399-413.
Courchesne, Eric ; Pierce, Karen ; Schumann, Cynthia ; Redcay, Elizabeth ; Buckwalter, Joseph A. ; Kennedy, Daniel P. ; Morgan, John. / Mapping early brain development in autism. In: Neuron. 2007 ; Vol. 56, No. 2. pp. 399-413.
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