Manuscript Publication by Urology Residents and Predictive Factors

Nicholas J. Hellenthal, Michelle L. Ramírez, Stanley Yap, Eric A Kurzrock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Many academic institutions have set expectations for peer reviewed publications, yet there is no objective guideline to gauge the performance of a urology resident or program. We quantified and determined predictive factors for resident manuscript production. Materials and Methods: Electronic surveys were sent to 255 chief residents and recent graduates of 83 accredited urological training programs in the United States and Canada. Survey questions pertained to manuscript submission and acceptance before and during residency, months of research incorporated into residency, PhD degree status and the pursuit of fellowship training. Results: Surveys were completed by 127 residents from 83 programs. The median number of manuscripts submitted and accepted during residency was 3 (range 0 to 32) and 2 (range 0 to 25), respectively. Months of protected research time and the number of publications before residency were significantly predictive of the number of manuscripts submitted during residency (p <0.001 and p <0.001, respectively). The number of manuscripts submitted during residency was significantly associated with entering fellowship training (p <0.05). Conclusions: Manuscript preparation and publication are important aspects of the training process at a number of urological surgery residency programs. While the majority of residents are not involved in publication before residency, most submit and publish at least 1 manuscript as first author in a peer reviewed journal during residency. The number of prior publications and months of allotted research time are significantly predictive of resident manuscript productivity. In turn, manuscript submission is indicative of the decision to pursue fellowship training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)281-287
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume181
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009

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Internship and Residency
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Education

Keywords

  • education
  • internship and residency
  • publishing
  • research
  • urology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Manuscript Publication by Urology Residents and Predictive Factors. / Hellenthal, Nicholas J.; Ramírez, Michelle L.; Yap, Stanley; Kurzrock, Eric A.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 181, No. 1, 01.2009, p. 281-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hellenthal, Nicholas J. ; Ramírez, Michelle L. ; Yap, Stanley ; Kurzrock, Eric A. / Manuscript Publication by Urology Residents and Predictive Factors. In: Journal of Urology. 2009 ; Vol. 181, No. 1. pp. 281-287.
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