Malaria parasite infection compromises colonization resistance to an enteric pathogen by reducing gastric acidity

Gregory T. Walker, Guiyan Yang, Julia Y. Tsai, Jorge L. Rodriguez, Bevin C. English, Franziska Faber, Lattha Souvannaseng, Brian P. Butler, Renée M. Tsolis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Malaria parasite infection weakens colonization resistance against Salmonella enterica serovar (S.) Typhimurium. S. Typhimurium is a member of the Enterobacterales, a taxon that increases in abundance when the colonic microbiota is disrupted or when the colonic mucosa is inflamed. However, here, we show that infection of mice with Plasmodium yoelii enhances S. Typhimurium colonization by weakening host control in the upper GI tract. P. yoelii–infected mice had elevated gastric pH. Stimulation of gastric acid secretion during P. yoelii infection restored stomach acidity and colonization resistance, demonstrating that parasite-induced hypochlorhydria increases gastric survival of S. Typhimurium. Furthermore, blockade of P. yoelii–induced TNF-α signaling was sufficient to prevent elevation of gastric pH and enhance S. Typhimurium colonization during concurrent infection. Collectively, these data suggest that abundance in the fecal microbiota of facultative anaerobes, such as S. Typhimurium, can be increased by suppressing antibacterial defenses in the upper GI tract, such as gastric acid.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbereabd6232
JournalScience Advances
Volume7
Issue number27
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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