Lymphatic dissemination of hepatic metastases. Implications for the follow-up and treatment of patients with colorectal cancer

D. A. August, P. H. Sugarbaker, Philip D Schneider

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

96 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hepatic spread of colorectal cancer is a prominent cause of treatment failure, but selected patients with liver metastases may attain long-term palliation or cure with liver resection. A review of the records of 81 patients seen at the National Cancer Institute for treatment of colorectal hepatic metastases revealed 7 instances of metastases discovered at operation within the hepatic lymphatic drainage in the absence of other extrahepatic tumor. These patients were studied with reference to location and stage of the primary colon cancer and location of metastases at the time of planned liver resection. All seven patients had their extrahepatic lymphatic disease limited to nodes draining the liver, implicating lymphatic dissemination from hepatic metastases as the mechanism of tumor spread. This pattern of spread rendered these patients unresectable for cure. If lymphatic metastases occur from hepatic tumor this implies a need for frequent and thorough follow-up of patients following resection of a primary colon cancer, and indicates urgency in treatment of liver metastases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1490-1494
Number of pages5
JournalCancer
Volume55
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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