Lutein, zeaxanthin, macular pigment, and visual function in adult cystic fibrosis patients

Christine Schupp, Estibaliz Olano-Martin, Christina Gerth, Brian M Morrissey, Carroll E Cross, John S Werner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Pancreatic insufficiency in cystic fibrosis (CF), even with replacement pancreatic enzyme therapy, is often associated with decreased carotenoid absorption. Because the macular pigment of the retina is largely derived from 2 carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, the decreased serum concentrations seen in CF may have consequences for ocular and retinal health Objectives: Our aims were to determine plasma carotenoid concentrations, determine absorption and distribution of macular pigment, and assess retinal health and visual function in CF patients. Design: In 10 adult CF patients (ages 21-47 y) and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects, we measured macular pigment density in vivo, measured serum lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations, and comprehensively assessed visual performance (including contrast sensitivity, color discrimination, and retinal function) under conditions of daylight illumination. Results: Serum lutein and zeaxanthin were significantly reduced (P<0.005) in CF patients (x - ± SD: 87 ± 36.1 and 27 ± 15.8 nmol/L, respectively) compared with control subjects (190 ± 72.1 and 75 ± 23.6 nmol/L, respectively). Although macular pigment optical density was significantly lower (P < 0.0001) in the CF group (0.24 ± 0.11) than in the control group (0.53 ± 0.12), no significant differences in visual function were observed. Conclusions: Adults with CF have dramatically low serum and macular concentrations of carotenoids (lutein and zeaxanthin), but their ocular status and visual function are surprisingly good. The clinical implications of low plasma concentrations of carotenoids in CF are yet to be clarified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1045-1052
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume79
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 2004

Fingerprint

Lutein
cystic fibrosis
zeaxanthin
lutein
Cystic Fibrosis
pigments
Carotenoids
carotenoids
Serum
eyes
Enzyme Replacement Therapy
Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency
Contrast Sensitivity
Macular Pigment
Zeaxanthins
Health
Lighting
retina
absorbance
Retina

Keywords

  • Carotenoids
  • Color vision
  • Contrast sensitivity
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Electroretinogram
  • Lutein
  • Macular pigment
  • Zeaxanthin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Lutein, zeaxanthin, macular pigment, and visual function in adult cystic fibrosis patients. / Schupp, Christine; Olano-Martin, Estibaliz; Gerth, Christina; Morrissey, Brian M; Cross, Carroll E; Werner, John S.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 79, No. 6, 06.2004, p. 1045-1052.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Pancreatic insufficiency in cystic fibrosis (CF), even with replacement pancreatic enzyme therapy, is often associated with decreased carotenoid absorption. Because the macular pigment of the retina is largely derived from 2 carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, the decreased serum concentrations seen in CF may have consequences for ocular and retinal health Objectives: Our aims were to determine plasma carotenoid concentrations, determine absorption and distribution of macular pigment, and assess retinal health and visual function in CF patients. Design: In 10 adult CF patients (ages 21-47 y) and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects, we measured macular pigment density in vivo, measured serum lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations, and comprehensively assessed visual performance (including contrast sensitivity, color discrimination, and retinal function) under conditions of daylight illumination. Results: Serum lutein and zeaxanthin were significantly reduced (P<0.005) in CF patients (x - ± SD: 87 ± 36.1 and 27 ± 15.8 nmol/L, respectively) compared with control subjects (190 ± 72.1 and 75 ± 23.6 nmol/L, respectively). Although macular pigment optical density was significantly lower (P < 0.0001) in the CF group (0.24 ± 0.11) than in the control group (0.53 ± 0.12), no significant differences in visual function were observed. Conclusions: Adults with CF have dramatically low serum and macular concentrations of carotenoids (lutein and zeaxanthin), but their ocular status and visual function are surprisingly good. The clinical implications of low plasma concentrations of carotenoids in CF are yet to be clarified.",
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