Low vitamin D levels in Northern American adults with the metabolic syndrome

S. Devaraj, G. Jialal, T. Cook, David Siegel, I. Jialal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Metabolic syndrome (MetS), is a constellation of cardiometabolic disease risk factors, that affects 1 in 3 US adults and predisposes to increased risks for both diabetes and cardiovascular disease. While epidemiological studies show low vitamin D [(25(OH)D] levels in MetS, there is sparse data on vitamin D status in MetS patients in North America. Thus, the aim of our study was to examine plasma vitamin D concentration among adults with MetS in Northern California (sunny climate), but without diabetes or cardiovascular disease. 25(OH)D levels were significantly decreased in MetS compared to controls. 8 % of controls and 30% of MetS North American adult subjects were deficient in 25(OH)D (<20 ng/ml; p=0.0236, Controls vs. MetS). There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to blood sampling in winter and summer months, total calcium and phosphate, and creatinine levels. Vitamin D levels were significantly inversely correlated with fasting glucose (r=0.29, p=0.04) and HOMA (r=0.34, p=0.04). Future studies of vitamin D supplementation in these subjects on subsequent risk of diabetes will prove instructive with respect to potential health claims in these high risk patients with MetS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-74
Number of pages3
JournalHormone and Metabolic Research
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Vitamin D
Medical problems
Cardiovascular Diseases
Creatinine
Blood
Health
Sampling
Plasmas
Glucose
North America
Climate
Epidemiologic Studies
Fasting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Low vitamin D levels in Northern American adults with the metabolic syndrome. / Devaraj, S.; Jialal, G.; Cook, T.; Siegel, David; Jialal, I.

In: Hormone and Metabolic Research, Vol. 43, No. 1, 2011, p. 72-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Devaraj, S. ; Jialal, G. ; Cook, T. ; Siegel, David ; Jialal, I. / Low vitamin D levels in Northern American adults with the metabolic syndrome. In: Hormone and Metabolic Research. 2011 ; Vol. 43, No. 1. pp. 72-74.
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