Longitudinal MRI and Cognitive Change in Healthy Elderly

Joel H. Kramer, Dan M Mungas, Bruce R Reed, Margaret E. Wetzel, Molly M. Burnett, Bruce L. Miller, Michael W. Weiner, Helena C. Chui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

188 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cross-sectional studies of normal aging indicate an association between memory and hippocampal volume, and between executive functioning and subcortical-frontal circuits. Much less is known, however, about the relationship between longitudinal MRI changes and cognitive decline. The authors hypothesized that longitudinal change in memory would be best predicted by change in hippocampal volumes, whereas change in executive functioning would be best predicted by cortical atrophy and progression of MRI markers of cerebrovascular disease. For this study, 50 healthy elderly subjects underwent structural MRI and cognitive testing at baseline and again at follow-up, with a mean follow-up interval of 45 months. Volumetric MRI measures were hippocampus, cortical gray matter, white matter signal hyperintensity (WMSH), and lacunae. Neuropsychological measures were psychometrically robust composite scores of episodic memory (MEM) and executive functioning (EXEC). Hierarchical multiple regression indicated that a decrease in hippocampus was associated with a decline in MEM, whereas decreased cortical gray matter and increased WMSH were independently associated with a decline in EXEC. Results suggest that in normal aging, cognitive functioning declines as cortical gray matter and hippocampus decrease, and WMSH increases. The association between WMSH and EXEC further highlights the cognitive sequealae associated with cerebrovascular disease in normal elderly.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)412-418
Number of pages7
JournalNeuropsychology
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007

Keywords

  • executive function
  • hippocampal volumes
  • memory
  • normal aging
  • white matter signal hyperintensity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

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  • Cite this

    Kramer, J. H., Mungas, D. M., Reed, B. R., Wetzel, M. E., Burnett, M. M., Miller, B. L., Weiner, M. W., & Chui, H. C. (2007). Longitudinal MRI and Cognitive Change in Healthy Elderly. Neuropsychology, 21(4), 412-418. https://doi.org/10.1037/0894-4105.21.4.412